depression and TMJ

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stonegirl
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depression and TMJ

Post by stonegirl » Tue Aug 26, 2008 1:43 pm

I have a loved one who is suffering severe chronic depression, as well as TMJ syndrome and teeth grinding.
I've been exploring craniosacral and think this would be a wonderful addition to the usual treatments. (currently on medication as well as undergoing talk therapy).
I would like to hear other ideas as well. Have you experienced a particularly effective modality for depression and TMJ? What route would you try if this were your client or yourself?

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JasonE
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Post by JasonE » Tue Aug 26, 2008 9:34 pm

Mindful exercise, such as a dynamic form of yoga that includes lots of breath training. Dynamic to get some aerobic benefit and increase endorphin levels. Yoga to emphasize body mechanics and self-awareness, the whole being integrating to achieve good form. Breath training to overcome the poor breathing habits that are endemic to those who have TMJ, clenching, bruxism, breath holding under stress, anxiety disorders, etc. Better breathing permits release of excess tension, allowing greater ease of movement, more flexibility and strength, and greater endurance for continuing practice.

Other stuff can work too, but that's my suggestion. Get this person into a class 2+ times per week, and encourage them to practice daily. I've seen dramatic personal and physical changes in just 2-4 months of this.
Jason Erickson, NCTMB, ACE-CPT, AIS-TA
Massage Therapist, Personal Trainer
http://www.CSTMinnesota.com

Internet forums are like going to the zoo; if you get enough monkeys together, sooner or later someone will start throwing their poo.

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stonegirl
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Post by stonegirl » Wed Aug 27, 2008 4:54 am

Mindful exercise, such as a dynamic form of yoga that includes lots of breath training.
Thanks Jason! Oh I am ALL ABOUT yoga!!! I will definately pass this info along.

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cstbrian
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Post by cstbrian » Wed Aug 27, 2008 6:25 am

(I sent this message to stonegirl based on a PM conversation we are having. It is a response I wrote to her and I did get her OK to post my reply here for others to learn from.)

The 10-step protocol is excellent for whole body balancing.

Not sure how in depth your training was, but in CSTI we talk about the 'Triad of Compression / Depression'. We find this occurs when three key points of the craniosacral system are all compressed. The three areas are L5-S1, the occipital cranial base, and the spheno-basilar joint. Sometimes when these three areas are compressed we find Idiopathic Endogenous Depression. In some situations compression of one or two of these areas can cause slight depression as well.

Because these are three key areas of the system, compression in these areas can tighten down the system; much like wearing t-shirt that is one or two sizes too small. This effects movement within the system, fluid exchange, and chemical/hormonal balances in the body. Remember that the pituitary gland sits within the body of the sphenoid. So imbalance in the system can have a significant effect on pituitary function.

If you do work on him, even if you do not do a full 10-step, I would do at least the following:
Pelvic Diaphragm release
L5-S1 decompression
ASIS medial compression
Dural tube traction from the sacrum
Thoracic Diaphragm release
Hyoid release
Occipital Cranial Base release (all 4 steps)
Sphenoid compression/decompression

If you have time remaining I'd work other cranial bones. Especially the temporals and mandible considering he has TMJ syndrome and is grinding.

Don't get me wrong, a full 10-step is great. But definitely spend a little more time evaluating/treating these specific areas.

When working, remember to stay light and stay neutral. Allow his body to do the work and show you what needs to be done. At some point you may want to consider having him get a session from an advanced trained therapist who does mouthwork. A compressed vomer has a huge impact on proper sphenoid motion and any hard palate issues can effect the TMJ.

I hope this helps a little bit. If you have any specific questions about techniques or what you are finding in treatment, I'd be glad to answer as best I can.

Good luck!
Brian

"Life isn't about finding yourself ... life is about creating yourself." George Bernard Shaw
"When we try to control that which is out of our control, we become an incredibly anxiety prone society." Dr. John Upledger

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Post by stonegirl » Sat Aug 30, 2008 4:02 am

just an update : I have been doing some of the CST tips that Brian has helped me with - and for the first time in my massage career I'm really feeling it - SO COOL!! It is definately helping him relax.
Also - for the TMJ I've started working his masseter - with one hand inside his mouth - I had never done work like this before but let me tell you it is amazing. It's been wonderful for relieving those clenched jaws!!

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Post by thebodyworker » Thu Sep 25, 2008 11:31 pm

I have a good section on it on my website with links to online articles by many different massage therapists

http://thebodyworker.com/massage-tmj-syndrome.htm

Julie

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Post by JaneBNH » Fri Sep 26, 2008 5:28 am

http://www.amazon.com/Balanced-Body-Tis ... 0781735750

This is the book we were issued for Neuromuscular massage in school. I really enjoyed reading the case studies accompanying each Tx. There is a good case study on TMJ. I use some of these techniques and they are very effective.

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Re: depression and TMJ

Post by antidote » Fri Oct 23, 2009 5:10 pm

I realize this reply is a year or so late, but when I saw it, I just wanted to add my experience. About five years ago, I was severely depressed and was suffering from terrible TMJD. I experienced periodic numbness in my arms, hands, and upper back, as well as headaches and neck pain. The depression preexisted the TMJD, but everything got worse with the pain. I had been to specialists, therapy, slept with an expensive mouthgaurd (which I gnawed in my sleep, cracking it), and still didn't find any relief. I could go on, but I'll just say I was miserable.

Anyway, I saw a friend for an hour of trigger point therapy, and towards the end of the session she somewhat hesitantly asked me if I was up for her to address some trigger points inside my mouth (she warned me it could be quite painful). At that point, it seemed worth a shot.

It was beyond excruciating that first time, but after a few minutes, she was done and everything had changed. Before I was off the table I was marvelling at how much relieving the pain had changed my outlook. Ten minutes later, I began working out plans to go to massage school (which had never been of interest before). I remained free of jaw pain for 9 days, at which point I had a follow up treatment, and then weekly for a couple of months. Five years later, no jaw pain and a career I'm still passionate about. (The few times I have experienced jaw tension from teeth grinding since, I've self treated inside my mouth and eliminated the discomfort.)

In clinic, during school, I had a client with bad TMJD, and he also experienced tremendous relief from trigger point work inside his mouth (of course supervised by my instructor who I had practiced on already). Also, I've used reiki on clients where inside the mouth work wasn't appropriate, or when we just needed a less invasive approach.

That turned out to be a longer post than I had intended, but, if your loved one still has jaw pain, it's definitely worth a shot to go at the trigger points. If your loved one is not still in pain, even better. :)

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JasonE
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Re: depression and TMJ

Post by JasonE » Fri Oct 23, 2009 5:46 pm

Rather than work inside the mouth, I have had success using positional release techniques for the pterygoids. Little to no client discomfort, and I can blend it into a massage without taking time for gloves. :D
Jason Erickson, NCTMB, ACE-CPT, AIS-TA
Massage Therapist, Personal Trainer
http://www.CSTMinnesota.com

Internet forums are like going to the zoo; if you get enough monkeys together, sooner or later someone will start throwing their poo.

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