Educating Clients on CST

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Gaspen
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Educating Clients on CST

Post by Gaspen » Sat Jun 21, 2008 1:58 pm

Although I've got other questions on how to educate clients (co-workers, friends, etc.) on the effecacy/how CST works, I'll start with one that I addressed today.

A little setup. One of the people I'm trying to line up for a practice session or two is a friend of mine who works at a salon (she's a stylist). We've talked about my looking forward to the upcoming class and subsequent taking of the class. She kind of surprised me by saying something along the lines that she was glad I was enjoying the work but she had to confess that she didn't think anything could possibly work by such a light amount of pressure.

So this is kind of what I told her (and other people):

The light amount of pressure allows your body to correct itself without any direction on my part. When working on a muscle or muscle group with regular massage, to a degree, I have a certain intent in mind. By using CST, your body does the directing, I'm just there to help facilitate the change or changes your body needs to make.

I also gave another example of the body processing CST:

Say, for example, that you want a snack. If you eat a couple of potatoe chips, even 'healthy' ones, your body will process the snack differently than if you were to eat a couple of grapes. In both cases, your 'snack attack' has been dealt with, but the healthy choice will contain vitamins, nutrients, etc., that your body needs.

(After reading this last one, I don't know if I'll use this educational point in the future.)

My question to all of you CST practicioners is what would you use to explain the effecacy of CST with so light a touch?

Thanks for your input.
Glad ta meetcha...I'm your handy man.
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AnastasiaB
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Post by AnastasiaB » Sat Jun 21, 2008 2:30 pm

:smt041 :smt026 :smt041

What a terrific way to describe craniosacral.......... your words make me wish I had thought of them............ fantastic!

Keep up the good work....
Anastasia B

Be who you are and say what you feel, because people who mind don't matter, and people who matter don't mind. - Theodore S. Geisel - [Dr. Seuss][

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ccMarie
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Post by ccMarie » Sat Jun 21, 2008 2:38 pm

I don't do CST, but the whole light pressure, therapeutic benefit issue made me think of one of the laws of physics I learned in massage shcool.

Arndt-Schultz Law
Weak stimuli activate physiological processes: very strong stimuli inhibit physiological responses.

I am not sure how to put this into words for CST, but for some people the weaker stimuli is very important for physiological change to occur.
You are not on this planet to produce anything with your body. You are on this planet to produce something with your soul. Your body is simply and merely the tool of your soul.

- Neale Donald Walsh Conversations with God

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healingtime
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Post by healingtime » Sat Jun 21, 2008 2:41 pm

hmmm, I really don't know if I have an answer, Gaspen, because I'm obviously not a practitioner yet! but, I wonder if clients were more informed or had some idea of what he craniosacral system was-if it would help. If there were some quick/painless way of explaining to somebody in a sentence or three? Although, I think as a general whole our society is a lot more comfortable with a "deep pressure" approach, regardless of what deeper pressure modality that might be. I'm just guessing really though.

I'm thinking that if a potential client had a better understanding of the system you're effecting, it might click better that what is actually needed from you is a lighter touch, and that a heavier touch would actually not work at all for their health--at least in relation to CST.

I had no idea until I got into school and started telling people what I am doing how many people had definite ideas and opinions about massage (and how "lumped" the word massage is-with no insight into any specific modality) and what it is or should be, regardless of the goal. Lots of room for client education is what I've seen emerging, and the variable(s) is how to go about educating and how open someone is to something new (to them.)

Anyway, these are just some of my thoughts. Maybe with word of mouth about your work, once those not exposed to it yet try it, it will help with others understanding/trusting that it works, even if not exactly understanding how?

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healingtime
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Post by healingtime » Sat Jun 21, 2008 2:59 pm

hehe, I'm sorry I think I just stated the obvious...you were asking for the explanation part I was thinking would be a great idea, lol...hmmmmm

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Re: Educating Clients on CST

Post by NC_kneader » Sat Jun 21, 2008 3:22 pm

Gaspen wrote: The light amount of pressure allows your body to correct itself without any direction on my part. When working on a muscle or muscle group with regular massage, to a degree, I have a certain intent in mind. By using CST, your body does the directing, I'm just there to help facilitate the change or changes your body needs to make.
That sounds lovely to me.
Gaspen wrote: Say, for example, that you want a snack. If you eat a couple of potatoe chips, even 'healthy' ones, your body will process the snack differently than if you were to eat a couple of grapes. In both cases, your 'snack attack' has been dealt with, but the healthy choice will contain vitamins, nutrients, etc., that your body needs.

(After reading this last one, I don't know if I'll use this educational point in the future.)
I agree. I cannot equate one with the other - it makes it sound like other modalities (potato chips) are not as beneficial as CST (grapes), which is like comparing the proverbial apples and oranges.

:idea: Actually, those would be a better comparision if you want to use foods, because they're both healthy, beneficial and from the same food group.

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Re: Educating Clients on CST

Post by cstbrian » Mon Jun 23, 2008 10:32 am

Gaspen wrote: So this is kind of what I told her (and other people):

The light amount of pressure allows your body to correct itself without any direction on my part. When working on a muscle or muscle group with regular massage, to a degree, I have a certain intent in mind. By using CST, your body does the directing, I'm just there to help facilitate the change or changes your body needs to make.
Yes! As CranioSacral Therapists we try to 'stay under the radar' allowing the client's body to be in full control. We simply support what his/her body needs to release in that session. Too much pressure and we are 'doing' rather than supporting.

Also, too much pressure and the tissue will resist the work. Keep in mind we are working with very sensitive, delicate nervous system tissues. Too much force and the system does not allow change.

I often use this narrative:
You are going to spend a beautiful day out on the lake fishing. You get to the dock and your boat (which is fortunately tied up) has drifted out away from the dock. You pick up the rope and give it one quick solid, hard, strong, tug. Of course nothing happens except perhaps you strained yourself.
Instead you get the idea that if you simply take up the slack in the rope and lean back that slowly, over a few minutes the boat will begin to move toward you as if without any effort. This is like CST.
We take up the slack in the tissues and with barely any effort wait for the tissues to release and move further in any given direction. It's a very natural way for the body to heal.
Brian

"Life isn't about finding yourself ... life is about creating yourself." George Bernard Shaw
"When we try to control that which is out of our control, we become an incredibly anxiety prone society." Dr. John Upledger

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Blisss
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Re: Educating Clients on CST

Post by Blisss » Fri Jun 27, 2008 8:16 am

cstbrian wrote:I often use this narrative:
You are going to spend a beautiful day out on the lake fishing. You get to the dock and your boat (which is fortunately tied up) has drifted out away from the dock. You pick up the rope and give it one quick solid, hard, strong, tug. Of course nothing happens except perhaps you strained yourself.
Instead you get the idea that if you simply take up the slack in the rope and lean back that slowly, over a few minutes the boat will begin to move toward you as if without any effort. This is like CST.
We take up the slack in the tissues and with barely any effort wait for the tissues to release and move further in any given direction. It's a very natural way for the body to heal.
That's a beautiful description, Brian. Thanks for sharing.

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