FIBROMYALGIA MASSAGE - DOES ANYONE SPECIALIZE

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danema
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FIBROMYALGIA MASSAGE - DOES ANYONE SPECIALIZE

Post by danema » Sun Jan 27, 2008 6:32 pm

For those that specialize in this modality, can you suggest what steps to take to get certified.

I'm not finding classes near my area(Charlotte, NC), only online courses, with some giving you CEU's that are recommended by NCTMB. I prefer to attend a live course(s).

Any suggestions would be appreciated!

Wanda

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Post by JasonE » Mon Jan 28, 2008 11:58 pm

I am curious what separates this from other forms of therapeutic work, in terms of techniques, protocols, etc. I regularly treat FMS people and am very curious.
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Post by Blisss » Tue Jan 29, 2008 6:46 am

The most effective therapy I've found for fibromyalgia is Lymph Drainage Therapy. I recommend the Upledger course series:
http://www.iahe.com/html/therapies/ldt.jsp

If you want to start with a great reference book on Fibromyalgia, I recommend this one:

Fibromyalgia & Chronic Myofasical Pain
by Devin Starlanyl & Mary Ellen Copeland

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Post by danema » Tue Jan 29, 2008 7:28 am

Bliss - thx for the link, Jason regarding your question, my desire is to learn more about specific techniques that would be most beneficial to FM/CFS clients. During my research, I have come across some information/classes such as www.fibrofit.com and articles such as http://medicalmassage-edu.com/ExtraArti ... yalgia.pdf.

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Post by Myrrha » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:00 am

I have found that working with FM clients is very similar to working with any other group. It varies for client to client. Some like a light lymphatic type massage, some prefer something deeper, some prefer a more myofascial approach. The key I have found is me being educated, reading what I can, and asking a lot of questions. Getting to know my client. I have found that most of my clients are quite happy to discuss their symptoms with me, and talk to me about what they are feeling. It has helped me tremendously.

I suppose my practice has a lot of FM clients because I was fortunate enough to meet a wonderful woman who runs an FM support group, and she refers a lot of people to me. I don't have any specific training in FM, I just read a lot and listen. And am willing to change up my treatment at the drop of a hat. No 2 fm clients have been alike.

If you find a good course, I"d be interested to know about it.

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Post by Blisss » Tue Jan 29, 2008 1:20 pm

Myrrha, I agree that listening to each client is so important, and the same goes for personalizing sessions for widely varying needs. I just want to comment on "light lymphatic-type massage." Although massage does move lymph a little bit, it's not the same as lymph drainage therapy. Lymph drainage is a repetitive, specific, slight stretching motion to the skin which pumps the lymph fluid directly. No lubricant is used. If a therapist is gliding over the skin, it's not lymph drainage. Most people with fibromyalgia have slow/stagnant lymphatic systems, which is why this work is so helpful to them. It's the only technique I have found that benefits 100% of my fibro clients.

I'm probably saying something you already know. From some of your other posts, I think you might be trained in lymph drainage? I wanted to outline the difference for people reading this thread who might not know there is a difference. I've seen too many therapists advertise lymphatic massage, when all they're really doing is light swedish.

Other than that, I agree with your post 100% :D

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Post by shivashiva » Tue Jan 29, 2008 5:39 pm

Sorry if this is derailing the thread, but Bliss or anyone can you recommend a good book or video that would give some detail on Lymphatic Drainage? I have always though that it was different from "light massage" but I just don't have any idea how and I don't have anyone in my area that does it (that I've found).

Thanks.
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Post by Blisss » Tue Jan 29, 2008 6:28 pm

shivashiva wrote:Sorry if this is derailing the thread, but Bliss or anyone can you recommend a good book or video that would give some detail on Lymphatic Drainage? I have always though that it was different from "light massage" but I just don't have any idea how and I don't have anyone in my area that does it (that I've found).
This DVD is a good place to start:
http://www.realbodywork.com/lymph/lymph.htm

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Post by Spock » Tue Jan 29, 2008 8:30 pm

Hi all, I never heard of certification or courses on it, but there should be. I am challenged with Fibro and CFS and make up about 70 % of my clients, due to my personal understanding it.
Some days they can take deeper, others lighter. A few things I have noticed in general is:

that heat generally helps them

lighter, slower more rhythmic kneading on an area for a longer time. This may cause you to have to schedule longer sessions. For example, a few passes on their shoulders (a fibro point) won't do, they need you to spend some time there, but usually slow and lighter.

Going deep may feel good to them in the moment, but the next day(s) they usually suffer for it.

Do not work attachments, it's much too painful for them.

The Barnes method of MFR (the gentle , slow stretching, kind) I know there has been some confusion on what MFR is, deep tissue or this gentle unwinding of facial tissue. The latter is the one to use here. MFR really, really helps Fibro people. It can be the most important part of the massage actually for longer term relief.

Know that their body will be different from day to day, week to week. Find out the common Fibromyalgia "hot spots" in the body to work longer, lighter. Neck, base of skull, traps, rhomboids, knees, etc.
My shoulder work is excellent.

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Post by Empathic~Heart » Tue Jan 29, 2008 11:09 pm

:ditto: to much of what Spock said, with the exception of deeper work.

I also have FMS, and it certainly does differ from day to day. In my own personal experience, deep tissue *always* makes me feel better - as long as it's a deep, compressive and SLOW stroke, not anything diggy at all. While I DO trigger point work, I don't LIKE having it done to me. WAY too point specific and often targets tender points that don't respond to the work.

My clients and I enjoy the deep, slow compressions, MFR (aka Barnes method), integrative stretching and heat. I also use serpentine marble stones that are heated, and they are very effective. Hot towels and moist hot towels that are changed throughout the session helps.

There is nothing worse than a therapist who is unskilled with FMS and does not take into consideration the client's feedback (which is crucial and must be encouraged) or experience with previous massage. I have encountered so many people living with FMS who have been injured by MTs who aren't aware of the sensitivity needed for this condition. Thankfully, I've also been able to convince some of these people to get back on the table (MY table) because of my personal experience. Actually, bodywork is how I manage my symptoms, and the strongest meds I ever take are ibuprofen and arnica.

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Post by crystal_compass » Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:43 am

Hi All -

I was diagnosed with Fibro for awhile. I had other symptoms however too that became quite severe and I would later be diagnosed with chronic tick borne illness (lyme and coinfections).

I went through extensive antibiotic treatment (we are talking months) and amazingly enough the fibro went away.

I share this because after what I have been through I have some theories that fibro could be the result of inflammation in the body due to bacterial, toxins, or viral origin.

I just think it is prudent to think of fibro in these terms and to definitely consider the lymph drainage as a big player in getting well.

Massage definitely has saved my health in so many aspects both receiving and giving it.

When I was at my worse even light touch could be so painful. Now that I am better I enjoy firm Swedish and MFR the best. Some deep tissue work will leave me feeling like I am relapsing for days.

I have taken the first two Vodder Lymph Drainage classes and I would recommend them highly. We learned that massage itself actually shuts down the lymph system temporarily because it puts the little lymph ducts into spasm but it quickly starts up again with in an hour of the massage being over.

It is such a light technique and our instructor reminded us numerous times "it is a skin technique".

The fact that MLD helps so many with fibro I think further supports my theory that fibro could be due to the issues I stated above.

I think as others have echoed here that the best treatment for fibro would be to address the stagnant lymph first and then myofascial release.

I guess I would just urge people to realize that this condition is still just a label for a set of symptomology that they still don't know the origin of. With that in mind realize that people with this condition cannot necessarily be easily 'fixed' by massage and to not get frustrated when improvement with treatments does not just improve overnight.

As well, be conscious that the origin could be due to infection, toxins, or viruses and understand that super deep tissue work without proper lymph support will put your client in a world of hurt.

I hope one day the mystery of this condition will be solved.

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Post by cstbrian » Wed Jan 30, 2008 7:11 am

I'm going to jump in here as well. I think we all agree there is no 'one' treatment for everyone. So, here's my angle from my private practice with CranioSacral Therapy.

I find that clients with fibromyalgia have a significant number of facilitated segments in the dural tube. Click here for some info on facilitated segments Sometimes it feels like their entire dural tube is facilitated.

One indication that there are facilitated segments is the client having chronic, always returning issues. Korr said that in order to treat and resolve the issue we need to treat the segment itself and all the tissues/organs/bones/fluid that are innervated by the facilitated segment. He believed this entire feedback loop needed to be addresses in one session to clear it up, otherwise it will return.

So, with CST we address this loop by working with the dural tube to release facilitated segments; we check for and release energy cysts along the nerve pathway and address fascial restrictions with gentle fascial release techniques.


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Post by Spock » Wed Jan 30, 2008 9:23 am

Empathic~Heart wrote::ditto: to much of what Spock said, with the exception of deeper work.

I also have FMS, and it certainly does differ from day to day. In my own personal experience, deep tissue *always* makes me feel better - as long as it's a deep, compressive and SLOW stroke, not anything diggy at all. .
TOTALLY agree with this, and I should have been clearer too. Some Fibro people can take deeper work, but it must be SLOW, compressive. Slow really is the key.

And I also have met many people who suffer from this who were told to try massage and went to someone who did not know how to treat it. Unfortunately, it turned into a very painful experience they are reluctant to try again. :( Schools really need to address/teach this.

cstbrian, CST really helped headaches I was having with this condition.
My shoulder work is excellent.

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Post by danema » Wed Jan 30, 2008 10:49 am

Thanks so much to everyone for your feedback...I'm learning alot just from your reply's to this topic. MLD, CST, MFR...I will continue to research these techniques/classes as well..


Myrra: in your reply, you asked about a course..so far I found a course given by a massage therapist(Wendi White) who has Fibromyalgia...her website is www.fibrofit.com...her next class is in March at. Holistic Massage Training Institute http://www.holisticmassagetraining.org..

I'm still looking for a good course near where I live. But keeping my options open to travel to Baltimore..

Thanks again to everyone for feedback

danema

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Post by crystal_compass » Wed Jan 30, 2008 11:29 am

Thanks cstbrian in regards to how CST fits in regards to fibro! I have taken Upledger's CST I course and plan continuing with the CST classes. Nice to hear how you have applied it to fibro!

Good luck danema. I will tell you that my physician treating the lyme once practiced right outside of Charlotte. I suspect you will see a lot of clients in the Charlotte area that have some form of tick borne disease, but NC is still very slow in recognizing it here because of poor testing and what many is believed are different strains.

Take care!

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Post by cstbrian » Wed Jan 30, 2008 3:38 pm

crystal_compass wrote:Thanks cstbrian in regards to how CST fits in regards to fibro! I have taken Upledger's CST I course and plan continuing with the CST classes. Nice to hear how you have applied it to fibro!
You are welcome!! You will learn all about energy cysts and facilitated segments in CSTII (in addition to much more!). Plus you will have all the tools for whole body evaluation so you can treat an entire feedback loop.
In the meantime, feel free to e-mail me if you have any questions about any of the 10-step techniques and how to apply them to clients.

I truly love this work!!!! :D
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Post by pueppi » Thu Jan 31, 2008 8:59 am

A little off topic, but an old thread on Fibro from I-I-P-P.

Curious about fibromyalgia clients - a poll
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specialization vs. certification

Post by cosmictouch » Thu Jan 31, 2008 9:11 am

Hi all,

This is a very good question. From what I read and researched through all the marketing books I have, these are two very different things. It seems to be the consensus that you can 'specialize' in anything you feel you are competent at. The issues can arise when you claim you are 'certified' in an area where you have had no training. That is at least how I understand it.

I would, like I think is the case with most people here, feel strange saying I 'specialize' in something when I have actually not had any training of any sort in it or any experience/feedback on whether I was effective in any technique.

Hope that made sense.... :)
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Post by Empathic~Heart » Fri Feb 01, 2008 5:46 pm

pueppi wrote:A little off topic, but an old thread on Fibro from I-I-P-P.

Curious about fibromyalgia clients - a poll
I have fibro, and I'm SO not a type A. I would say I'm wound up tight at times, but I'm also as wide open and loose as a goose other times. ;)

The thing that bothers me the most about that thread, is the assumptions people make about fibro. It DOES include psychological issues (depression, anxiety, poor memory, mental "fuzziness" etc) but it is NOT necessarily stemming from those issues. Meaning we're not crazy, we're not making it up and we're not malingering.

I'm thankful to live in a city where a great deal of research is being conducted for those who live with fibro, cause it ain't no picnic and I wouldn't wish the ups and downs on anyone.

www.myalgia.com

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Post by Myrrha » Fri Feb 01, 2008 6:31 pm

Bliss,
"light lymphatic-type massage." Although massage does move lymph a little bit, it's not the same as lymph drainage therapy. Lymph drainage is a repetitive, specific, slight stretching motion to the skin which pumps the lymph fluid directly. No lubricant is used. If a therapist is gliding over the skin, it's not lymph drainage. Most people with fibromyalgia have slow/stagnant lymphatic systems, which is why this work is so helpful to them. It's the only technique I have found that benefits 100% of my fibro clients.
Thank you for that clarification. I have some lymphatic drainage training, but I have not taken a vodder course, or upledger or anything like that yet. It was part of our training in school. Because it was not a specific CEU, I often don't think of it, and albeit incorrectly use the term light lymphatic - type. I incorporate it into my massages at the beginning especially when I have been asked to do a light massage as opposed to a deep massage. I rarely do lymphatic by it's self.

Thank you for pointing out I am using the term as an adjective/adverb when I shouldn't. I should be much more careful in how I describe stuff. :oops:

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Post by JasonE » Fri Feb 01, 2008 11:56 pm

I've seen some FMS folks get great results with CranioSacral Therapy, and I've recommended it to a few.

That said, here's a nice article on treating FMS by Dr. Leon Chaitow, published in Massage Therapy Journal:
http://www.amtamassage.org/journal/pdf/ ... yalgia.pdf
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Fibromyalgia Massage

Post by wendi2580 » Sat Feb 16, 2008 2:12 pm

I teach Fibromyalgia Massage. I have been using the full body fibromyalgia massage protocol for 10 years. I am now sharing it with others. I look forward to hearing from those of you who are interested in learning this technique. Learn from someone who has FM, and who's clientele is 90% FM sufferers. I have also written 3 books on FM.

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Post by pueppi » Sat Feb 16, 2008 3:16 pm

Empathic~Heart wrote:
pueppi wrote:A little off topic, but an old thread on Fibro from I-I-P-P.

Curious about fibromyalgia clients - a poll
I have fibro, and I'm SO not a type A. I would say I'm wound up tight at times, but I'm also as wide open and loose as a goose other times. ;)

The thing that bothers me the most about that thread, is the assumptions people make about fibro. It DOES include psychological issues (depression, anxiety, poor memory, mental "fuzziness" etc) but it is NOT necessarily stemming from those issues. Meaning we're not crazy, we're not making it up and we're not malingering.
Sorry the thread bothered you, but I didn't read into it that fibro clients were "making it up" or "crazy", as you mention here. I did read that it regularly has a psychological component - something that many people miss.

I think reading the entire thread sheds light on fibro situations and that's why I added it. Again, sorry if it bothered you.
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Post by Empathic~Heart » Sun Feb 17, 2008 11:00 pm

pueppi wrote:Sorry the thread bothered you, but I didn't read into it that fibro clients were "making it up" or "crazy", as you mention here. I did read that it regularly has a psychological component - something that many people miss.

I think reading the entire thread sheds light on fibro situations and that's why I added it. Again, sorry if it bothered you.
Nah, not to worry.

There are common misconceptions about those of us w/fibro, and the assumptions the typical laypersons make (as in that thread) just get old.
But there are also some very good points made about FMS, so not all is lost! ;)

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Fibromyalgia Massage

Post by wendi2580 » Mon Feb 18, 2008 5:42 am

For those of you discussing the psychological component of FM...Yes, there is a mix of it. After various years of research (and having it myself)I have come up with the following: FM is caused by a trauma to the body (physical or emotional), such as an injury to the body or prolonged stress. When this happens, our brain tries to correct it and tells our other organs to either increase or decrease their production of enzymes, hormones and such. This causes a disruption in how the body functions and creates all the symptoms of FM such as insomnia, irritable bowel, muscle pain, fatigue, etc. The part you need to know is how that affects their muscles. I teach that in my class- you get the whole gammut of what FM is, how it affects the body, and how to help relieve the pain in their muscles and quiet the symptoms associated with FM. You can help them! Their is hope. We are not depressed and therefore get FM, we get FM and the only way the doctors know how to alleviate the sleeping problem is to give us antidepressants. It goes like this...our body is malfunctioning, we have too much of a pain receptor called substance "P" in our body, and not enough Serotonin (the substance that helps us to sleep and is suppose to curtail substance "P" from elevating. Therefore the doctor gives us an antidepressant, one that puts more Serotonin into our body to try to balance out the two substances and helps us to sleep. The problem is it doesnt correct the body into doing its job so you end up staying on the antidepressant and then people think you are depressesd. Hope this helps you to understand this side of FM.
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