smell like rose/see with hands

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smell like rose/see with hands

Postby holley on Thu Jan 10, 2008 12:55 pm

Both these threads intrigue me.
Providing touch, smell, sound & taste that harmonize to invoke inner sight seems, intuitively, to have healing potential. Attuning the senses to the same, uh, hm, Purpose??? Octive??? what's a word for this?
Is anyone familiar with any studies on this topic and/or be willing to co develop an experiment(s) to test this out?
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Postby Ella Menneau on Thu Jan 10, 2008 4:55 pm

I think what you may be thinking of is called synesthesia--

From answers.com:
A condition in which one type of stimulation evokes the sensation of another, as when the hearing of a sound produces the visualization of a color.
A sensation felt in one part of the body as a result of stimulus applied to another, as in referred pain.
The description of one kind of sense impression by using words that normally describe another.



Coloured-hearing is the most common form of synaesthesia, in which hearing a word elicits the perception of colour. The colour sensation elicited by a word is often determined by the letters in the word, with the first letter being the most influential.


I find this to be a fascinating subject!
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Re: smell like rose/see with hands

Postby akb on Thu Jan 10, 2008 5:22 pm

holley wrote:Both these threads intrigue me.


I am missing something, are these threads/discussions on BWOL? Can you provide links?

The synaesthesia reminds me of a book I was reading called Born On A Blue Day by Daniel Tammet, the autobiography of an autistic savant with Asperger's syndrome.
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Postby holley on Thu Jan 10, 2008 9:37 pm

Both threads are in off the table topics AKB ;
1) Seeing with our hands
2) coworker smells like a rose.

Ella thanks for the definition and the blurb on coloured hearing, fascinating indeed.
"A Natural History of The Senses" by Diane Ackerman devotes a chapter to this phenomenon.
Roughly, I'm wondering if the 5 senses are different octaves of the same scale, so to speak, & applying harmonized sense treatment has healing potential AND/OR if synesthesia would develop in test subjects.
'Every Day is a god, each day a goddess and holiness pours forth in time."
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this may not address your ? directly, but this is my take it

Postby livgreen on Fri Jan 11, 2008 11:51 am

Hi Holley,
Yes, a very interesting topic. A coincidence – I was talking to my wife about this just a few weeks ago following an injury she sustained to her knee while taking an aerobics class.
I can speak from my experience regarding the “seeing with your hands” issue. For me, I will be referring to “the wound site” as the focus of my “internal visual” stimulus, as this is what I primarily deal with. As a hand therapist, I almost never work with a patient who does not have an injury of some kind. Furthermore, I also suspect that many therapists have and are capable of eliciting this ability.
So - For me, this developed over the many years of day-in and day-out palpation of injured tissue sites; 8 – 10 hours a day; 5 days a week. When I think back about it, when I was a new therapist, I would palpate an area of injury – visualize it in my mind while requesting verbal feed-back from the patient as to how the specific injury site or spot felt as I palpated – they would respond: “yes, that’s the spot”; “that feels like it’s bruised” or “this spot has a burning/electric feeling to it”; etc.
As you do this again and again, your brain begins to develop a “visual” interpretation of the structures you are feeling below your fingers. Your brain will form a visual image the moment you receive the verbal feed-back. “OK – this is what a muscle belly tear feels (looks) like”. Your mind takes a snap shot, if you will, of that moment – piecing together your tactile input along with the patient report, forming the “internal visual image”. Over time, these images in your mind begin to form very real sensory/visual memory eliciting responses resulting in the “seeing with your hands” effect.
This is all very similar to a neurological “process”, Stereognosis – roughly, the ability to identify an object using the sense of touch alone. Try this yourself. Have someone place 5 common place objects in a bowl – anything like; a penny, paper clip, pen cap, marble and a rubber band, for example. Close your eyes and pick up each item. Feel the object with your fingers and identify the object with out ever looking at it. Easy – right? Yes, that is because you have formed a very strong visual and tactile connection with these objects so that now, your brain can easily decipher the tactile input alone, without ever having to use your eyes to elicit the typical “visual/tactile” image in your mind of what that object is.

In my opinion, this can and will be developed in any person who has a strong knowledge of anatomy (and physiology). This is an important factor in order to formulate the initial visual image in ones mind. Secondly, the person would need to have the opportunity to “touch/palpate” many many injury sites over a consistent and lengthy time frame to “build up” and train the mind to see in this new way. And most importantly, the person would have to receive that initial and immediate verbal feed-back given from the patient while touching the wound site. That immediate verbal feed-back of the reported injury site and how it “feels”, along with the visual “image” your mind creates as an interpretation of what a specific injury “feels” like (without the use of your “external visual” senses) is how, in my opinion, how one begins to develop this ability.
So, if your clients/patients are willing…start communicating with them.
I hope this was clear enough? I’m sure an in depth article can be written about this topic – I have given you my spin on this. And of course, this does not only apply to injuries…
Bye for now,
LG
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Postby akb on Fri Jan 11, 2008 1:00 pm

Ah, here they are for anyone else who couldn't find them:

Co-worker Smells Like A Rose

"Seeing" with our hands
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Re: smell like rose/see with hands

Postby holley on Sat Jul 21, 2012 12:38 pm

Any updates here would also be of interest....
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Re: smell like rose/see with hands

Postby holley on Mon Dec 26, 2016 11:57 am

Still reread livgreen's post as a reminder to orient and align myself to both myself and celebrant physically. Yet there is more and reaching towards that as well.. Any other experiences/insights/aspirations BWOL members would be welcomed. Please share.
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What dreams may come

Postby holley on Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:38 am

"When you hear a B-flat music note, do you see the color blue? Do the words in this sentence look red or green? If so, you may have synesthesia,"

http://www.sciencemag.org/news/2018/03/ ... esia-18251
Last edited by holley on Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:53 am, edited 1 time in total.
'Every Day is a god, each day a goddess and holiness pours forth in time."
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2Types of Synesthesia relevant to bodywork

Postby holley on Wed Mar 07, 2018 6:52 am

"In auditory-tactile synesthesia, certain sounds can induce sensations in parts of the body. For example, someone with auditory-tactile synesthesia may experience that hearing a specific word feels like touch in one specific part of the body or may experience that certain sounds can create a sensation in the skin without being touched. It is one of the least common forms of synesthesia.[26] However, some speculate that the common phenomenon of autonomous sensory meridian response (ASMR), in which auditory stimuli or trigger words create a tingling sensation in the body without being touched, to be a form of auditory-tactile synesthesia, meaning that it could be more common than current statistics imply."

"Mirror- Touch is a form of synesthesia where individuals feel the same sensation that another person feels (such as touch). For instance, when such a synesthete observes someone being tapped on their shoulder, the synesthete involuntarily feels a tap on their own shoulder as well. People with this type of synesthesia have been shown to have higher empathy levels compared to the general population. This may be related to the so-called mirror neurons present in the motor areas of the brain, which have also been linked to empathy.[30]"
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