Im thinking about becoming a MT,its a good job for males????

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jam20
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Im thinking about becoming a MT,its a good job for males????

Post by jam20 » Thu Mar 29, 2007 7:10 pm

:cry: I've reading lots of comments on this board and I gotta say,Im a litte bit afraid of becoming a MT after reading all the threads about discrimination towards male MTs.

My name is Juan,Im 18 years old and Im thinking about being a MT,I didn't know about the discrimination issue but I feel this is the only thing I know I'd complete because A) It's interesting and B) I'ts a short career (I think) but now Im thinking I may be out of job in a future or making very little money and I don't want that,this is really sad. I must say I live in Miami and maybe is easier down here because of the gay men and turism,but I don't know...

What do you guys think? Should I study or will it be very hard to find a job? Im also a person who suffers from depression and I don't wanna feel frustrated in a future or even in school. Help me please. Thank you :(

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holistichealer
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Re: Im thinking about becoming a MT,its a good job for males

Post by holistichealer » Thu Mar 29, 2007 7:38 pm

jam20 wrote::cry: I've reading lots of comments on this board and I gotta say,Im a litte bit afraid of becoming a MT after reading all the threads about discrimination towards male MTs.

My name is Juan,Im 18 years old and Im thinking about being a MT,I didn't know about the discrimination issue but I feel this is the only thing I know I'd complete because A) It's interesting and B) I'ts a short career (I think) but now Im thinking I may be out of job in a future or making very little money and I don't want that,this is really sad. I must say I live in Miami and maybe is easier down here because of the gay men and turism,but I don't know...

What do you guys think? Should I study or will it be very hard to find a job? Im also a person who suffers from depression and I don't wanna feel frustrated in a future or even in school. Help me please. Thank you :(
Jam20,

If you are serious about doing this for a living I say do let anything stop you. I am starting my journey this fall and I had a lot of the same doubts that you are having now. I am 24 years old and will have my Bachelor's degree in May but I really felt drawn to helping people so I pushed aside my doubts and just trusted my heart. I would suggest you follow whatever your dreams may say to you.

As far as a job, I would say that I have seen and heard on this forum that a lot of people may have an issue with male MTs but there are also a lot of people who will prefer a man to be their MT due to the strength of our hands (at least for the most part). I say get your training and follow what you really want to do. Who knows, this might be exactly what you need to realize where you belong on your life's path:-) Anymore and feel free to PM me. Best of luck!!

holistichealer :)
"Tell me I'm frozen
But what can I do?
Can't tell the reasons
I did it for you"---Within Temptation "Frozen"

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HappyKarma
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Post by HappyKarma » Thu Mar 29, 2007 7:41 pm

Juan,
I have to say,I have had nothing but a wonderful career so far. I have had to go through some challenging experiences early in my career as a male massage therapist, but I now am beginning to enjoy my practice alot and I have had few problems once I decided what I wanted in my ideal practice. I would say go for it,cause you can suceed! :smt023

Namaste'
Johnny
"When life wrinkles you up,get a massage"

jam20
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Post by jam20 » Thu Mar 29, 2007 7:51 pm

Wow thank you very much guys!!! Thank you!!!

Can I ask how long the whole trainning was and how much did you guys paid??

And also,I'd like to know how is the monetary situation for you "Happykarma" and if it was easy the first couple of years when it comes to money,if you don't mind,of course.

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holistichealer
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Post by holistichealer » Thu Mar 29, 2007 8:06 pm

You are more then welcome Juan. To answer your question about the tuition mine is a tiny bit over 17k for 14 months with everything included and even my table. Best of luck dude!

holistichealer
"Tell me I'm frozen
But what can I do?
Can't tell the reasons
I did it for you"---Within Temptation "Frozen"

jam20
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Post by jam20 » Thu Mar 29, 2007 8:08 pm

holistichealer wrote:You are more then welcome Juan. To answer your question about the tuition mine is a tiny bit over 17k for 14 months with everything included and even my table. Best of luck dude!

holistichealer
Thank you very much for your help Holistichealer,maybe I'll give it a try ;)

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palpable
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Post by palpable » Thu Mar 29, 2007 9:11 pm

Discrimination is whatever you let it be. Yes, I have had clients turn down sessions with me because I am a guy. So what. That leaves space in my calender for clients who are better suited for my work.

As for the money: You have probably seen the ads stating that you can make $70/hr or whatever. You can. But it is important to note that you will have to split that with the bus. you work for, you will have to take out your own money for taxes, you will, at most work 15-20 hands on hours per week- and that usually will be after you build up a clientele, which can take a couple of years, and you don't get paid for all the time you spend networking, putting out bus. cards, etc.

But, despite that fact that it takes time to make money and build a client base, this is a great job, and I love going to work.
Move on as quickly as you can to people who get you and what you do. -Robert Chute

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Vitalia
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Post by Vitalia » Fri Mar 30, 2007 9:47 am

palpable wrote:
But, despite that fact that it takes time to make money and build a client base, this is a great job, and I love going to work.
I agree with almost everything that has been posted here in this thread. Since it generally does take awhile to build up your client base, massage can also be a good career to transition into from another career.

I found that it was possible for me to supplement my income for awhile doing massage part-time and then after I had some regular clients it made it much easier for me to leave my 9-5 desk job and work full-time as a massage therapist.

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Vitalia
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Post by Vitalia » Fri Mar 30, 2007 9:51 am

palpable wrote:Discrimination is whatever you let it be. Yes, I have had clients turn down sessions with me because I am a guy. So what. That leaves space in my calender for clients who are better suited for my work.
In my early days of doing massage I used to really stress about the problem of discrimination against male therapists, but eventually I got to the point where I was able to finally let go of it and now I take a similar approach to what "palpable" takes.

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HappyKarma
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650 hour

Post by HappyKarma » Fri Mar 30, 2007 10:09 am

I don't mind sharing at all.My training was a 9 month,650 hour program that cost me about $5400,including my table.Honestly Juan,I had my issues starting out,but over the course of the almost 2 years I have been at it,things are finally beginning to work out. I currently do about 25 hours of massage/Reiki per week,and I am making great income, and I can keep all of my income because I work solo.I do alot of chair massage for practice building,marketing,company work and outreach work. I don't have any major expenses to speak of-besides space rent and the occasional CEU course. I have had my share of clients who had issues with me as a male therapist for some reason or another,but now have alot of lovely clients who enjoy the work I do and keep rebooking appointments- I take great pride going to work averyday, seeing the changes in my clients and watching the stress just melt away-I hope to do this for the rest of my life. It will take time to build a faithful clientele,but you can do it! :)

Good Luck!
Johnny
"When life wrinkles you up,get a massage"

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JasonE
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Post by JasonE » Tue Jul 24, 2007 12:31 am

I attended Northwestern Health Sciences University in Bloomington, MN, and it was a GREAT experience! The faculty, staff, and students were all great to be around - the atmosphere is truly health-oriented and positive. The program was one year and over 780 hours, with plenty of anatomical science, including frequent cadaver labs, pathology, and LOTS of hands-on training so you truly understand the WHERE, WHY, and HOW of treatment.

We had some interaction with the chiropractic and oriental medicine colleges on campus, and it was a great place to make connections with a wide variety of health professionals. My class had several men, no gender problems, a wide range of ages, and multiple races represented. It's the only COMTA-accredited program in MN, and I recommend it to anyone that wants solid preparation for working in a wide variety of venues, especially hospitals/clinics, chiropractic offices, and other medical locations.

I LOVE my work, and it was VERY EASY to find a job. I am often booked solid and my income is fine.
Jason Erickson, NCTMB, ACE-CPT, AIS-TA
Massage Therapist, Personal Trainer
http://www.CSTMinnesota.com

Internet forums are like going to the zoo; if you get enough monkeys together, sooner or later someone will start throwing their poo.

StressSolutions

Post by StressSolutions » Tue Jul 24, 2007 12:53 pm

JasonE wrote:I attended Northwestern Health Sciences University in Bloomington, MN, and it was a GREAT experience! The faculty, staff, and students were all great to be around - the atmosphere is truly health-oriented and positive. The program was one year and over 780 hours, with plenty of anatomical science, including frequent cadaver labs, pathology, and LOTS of hands-on training so you truly understand the WHERE, WHY, and HOW of treatment.

We had some interaction with the chiropractic and oriental medicine colleges on campus, and it was a great place to make connections with a wide variety of health professionals. My class had several men, no gender problems, a wide range of ages, and multiple races represented. It's the only COMTA-accredited program in MN, and I recommend it to anyone that wants solid preparation for working in a wide variety of venues, especially hospitals/clinics, chiropractic offices, and other medical locations.

I LOVE my work, and it was VERY EASY to find a job. I am often booked solid and my income is fine.
That Northwestern facility is wonderful. I attended a Winter Symposium one winter, met some great people. Thanks for posting, Jason!

TheStuduadmire
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Post by TheStuduadmire » Wed Jul 25, 2007 5:50 pm

Sure there is alot of discrimination against males but the key to being successful is MARKETING! If you can do that, nothing can stop you. Just make sure you have a good practice.

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JasonE
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Post by JasonE » Wed Jul 25, 2007 6:57 pm

TheStuduadmire wrote:Sure there is alot of discrimination against males but the key to being successful is MARKETING! If you can do that, nothing can stop you. Just make sure you have a good practice.
As a male, I get LOTS of requests from people that need/want "deeper work." There is a general public perception that men are stronger than women and that strength makes men better at deep work. Consequently, many of my regular clients started out asking for me to just "get in there, I can take pain!" :roll:

Now they all know that pain isn't always necessary, and that heavy pressure may not be the solution to their problems. And they just keep coming back... and referring others! :smt023

As a male, you may benefit from some common misperceptions. Marketing will get them in the door, but ultimately your skill and professionalism will determine how many of them stay with you and send more patients your way.
Jason Erickson, NCTMB, ACE-CPT, AIS-TA
Massage Therapist, Personal Trainer
http://www.CSTMinnesota.com

Internet forums are like going to the zoo; if you get enough monkeys together, sooner or later someone will start throwing their poo.

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Post by Pandoras_Gift » Fri Aug 03, 2007 7:54 am

Off topic discussion was split from this point... please continue this post on topic. If you want to start another discussion please create a new post regarding the new topic!

Split post can be found here regarding client vs. patient.


http://www.bodyworkonline.com/forum/vie ... highlight=
love as always,
Muriel

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Post by sillypup » Tue Sep 04, 2007 11:03 pm

if your serious in this career. i say go for it. most clients want males too if you have the skills. just don't go halfway like most therapist. make sure your skill is above average. It's tough working for others as there is discrimination due to business owners thinking clients only want female therapist. true but those are for swedish pampering massage clients. go for the therapeutic massages where you get into those knots. plenty of clients for those. all high-end spas are focus on pampering so you'll find sexism there as that is their target niche. pampering for the rich. a number's game. best to start your own practice after you develop your style, skills. spas are great for training as you get variety of body types.

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Post by aroma4u » Thu Oct 18, 2007 4:21 pm

Its like any other field , to get set up it will take you time but once you are set you will not have any problem at all as long as you are doing a good job . Like any other product if the quality is good people will come back .

chiyoko
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Hi Juan

Post by chiyoko » Sun Oct 28, 2007 11:07 pm

I have been practicing massage before massage was even cool. I really got my start in the Air Force in 1972 while stationed in Southeast Asia and have been doing it off and on ever since.

I was working for the government until Congress decided to upset the apple cart and close the base I was working at in 1995. My wife actually had to talk me into going into massage full time at that point, so I checked out some massage schools and chose one in PA.

I started in May of 1996 and graduated in November of same year. There were 12 of us in the class and as of this date, I only know of 2 that are still doing massage full time, myself and another male classmate.

Yes, it has not been an easy road for me as a male massage therapist, but it's not the destination that is important, it's the journey. Massage training will help with depression and give you such a confidence that is unexplainable because after massage school the real training begins.

You can do and be anything you want in this life, so don't let anyone tell you differently, especially yourself.

Since my graduation from massage school in 1996, I have become Nationally Certified, started my own practice and work with a chiropractor. I have met other massage therapists and shared ideas and techniques, used some of their marketing skills to enhance my practice and learned from physical therapists about joint stabilization methods.

One thing I have learned, if you a passion for the health of your clients, it will show and they will appreciate it. My clients have traveled more than 30 miles to have me work on them, but it has taken time for that to happen. It's not going to be an overnight success. Don't wait for people to magically show up on your doorstep for a massage because it just won't happen. Take massage to them. Once you graduate, join a chamber of commerce or downtown business council and get to know the business owners and then begin to share your talents with them. They will appreciate that.

Well, I have spoken my heart so I will leave you with this thought:

"Believe in yourself and feel confident that you CAN achieve anything you set your mind to!"

"Follow your heart without asking whether its OK to do so."

Chiyoko
:cat:

elsewhere
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Post by elsewhere » Mon Oct 29, 2007 12:34 am

Awesome thoughts Chiyoko. Much wisdom in your words. Glad to see another old timer of the male persuasion. We do exist.

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Post by YFChoice » Mon Oct 29, 2007 7:43 am

I've been a massage therapist for 7 years.......in a state (Utah) where touch of any kind is looked at as somewhat suspicious. It is getting better with the influx of people that are not of the religious persuasion that is dominant here.

So I knew from the beginning that it might be difficult for a male to practice here. I decided to focus my career on doing chair massage.......it was less invasive to lots of people because they could keep their clothes on.......they could try out a 10 minute massage first before deciding to spend the money (another consideration here) for a longer table massage.

It's turned out to be the best move I ever could have made. Instead of using my chair to promote my table business, my chair is my business. I do lots of corporate and convention work. In fact, for 2 years I had a company take me when they would travel to conventions in other places.

From the chair work, I have ended up with a very nice sideline of table work with my chair clients......both female and male. I have discoverd that people that really want and understand the benefits of massage (the kind you want for clients) don't, for the most part, care whether you're a male or female therapist. They want someone who is good!!!!!!

As a male therapist, I think I've had to work a little harder to get clients. Which meant I had to focus a lot on my marketing, my massage techniques, my people skills. I see no downside to that. Plus, I believe that I am THE one that can help my clients the best. I am not offended by someone that prefers a female therapist, just as I'm not offended that someone prefers reiki over a modality that I do, or prefers pepsi over coke.

I have no regrets over entering this field. I hope you won't either.
You have to think anyway....you might as well think big.
~ Donald Trump ~

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Post by sillypup » Sat Nov 03, 2007 9:07 am

yea, it's tough for males. it's all about networking though since most companies aren't in it for helping clients but profits. only way i see you making it is having your own practice. I guess it also depends on where your working. here in the bay area it's tough for males. too many sexism against males, not only males, it's also against racism. I don't see many other male ethnics doing massage other than whites. rarely do I see asian at all. most can't make it. this post isn't to scare you. it's just reality check. working for others isn't the way to go. you will have to venture off into your own business if you want to make some decent money. Right now i'm unemployed looking for part time work. it's tough. all the spas want females or they don't want to pay what your worth. of course i'm over qualified so they don't want to pay me my worth. they want someone who fulfill the least requirement they ask for so they can pay them unfairly. it's just part of business. Just the fact that i'm asian don't help either since their clients are not asians, they usually want female who are white ethnicity. The people that do the hiring usually don't know how to hire quality therapist and that is the reason for so many turnovers. this is my experience and many that i've talked to in the bay area of San francisco. I think other states and cities are different.

Xpat
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Post by Xpat » Sat Aug 16, 2008 7:02 am

Thanks to all for a great thread. I've been wavering the past few months but I think I can pull this off. I plan to go to massage school in NM when I get back to America next year.

hawaiianhealing
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my thoughts

Post by hawaiianhealing » Tue Apr 21, 2009 3:10 pm

I always ask people who want to become a massage therapist these questions:

Do you like to get people out of pain?

Why do you like to get people out of pain?

Are you willing to accept that about 50% of newly graduating massage therapists are out of the field with-in a year of graduation? and 70% are out of the field with-in 3 years?

are you willing to accept that the average massage therapist makes $15,000 (ambp numbers) or $18,000 (amta numbers) per year? And the amta numbers are with an average of 7 years of experience?

how much bodywork/massage work have you gotten? what kinds of massage therapy have you gotten?

what kind or kinds of massage techniques did you like best? and why

what kind of kinds of massage techniques did you like least and why?

have you taken a massage therapist out to lunch to talk to about the field? if so how long have they been in the field?


Get lots of body work done to yourself, ask therapist what they think of what they do. Ask therapist who work in spas, massage envy, private practice, etc. before you spend a good chunk of money and energy becoming a therapist. I have had people thank me for asking them these questions and some who wished they had listened to my questions after they had spent a year in school, got 12,000 dollars in debt and found out that they only wanted to touch a loved one for a short massage.

"We believe that learning the art of massage is first and foremost a journey of exploration into your own self. Before you can respectfully enter the intimate arena of physical contact with another human being you must first explore accept and understand your own world."
"We believe that learning the art of massage is first and foremost a journey of exploration into your own self."

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