False Allegations...

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BlackSwanMassage
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False Allegations...

Post by BlackSwanMassage » Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:14 pm

So, I got called into my chiro's office today, to find out that I was accused by a patient's mother of sexual harrassment. Apparently, she (the daughter) disliked my method of working her piriformis (draped, with one side at a time exposed, then covered when I've finished.)

My chiro wasn't all that upset with the situation--he's ben down that road with female patients before, and basically told me to see it as a "wake-up call".

It shook me up quite a bit, and I requested the afternoon off. He let me go to the house and do some computer work for him from there, and said that the other therapist would take up the slack.

As I drove home, I got to thinking a little more about it, and I realized a couple of things:

1) This is a patient who was on my table no less than five times. I never deviated from my treatment plan--it's all documented. If she was so upset about it--even if she couldn't address it with me--why not address it to the doctor, or just not come back?

2) This allegation is just coming forward now, through a third party. We just sent out collections notices in the last few weeks. Her name was on the list, owing a substantial amount of money.

Now, everything I allegedly did took place before I was licensed (in FL, you can work as a CA doing soft tissue manipulation under the supervision of a chiropractor), and everything that took place was completely defensible by any prudent therapist under the same circumstances--it was what we were taught in school. This woman's mother (let me point out that the daughter in question was in her early 20's--this was not an underaged girl) has obviously done what she feels is her duty by reporting it, and no action has been brought before the Board, so apparently it'll all blow over as it stands. What bugs me though, is that it all seems to add up to someone who's trying to find a way to avoid paying a bill! What's worse is that she's alleging that I did the same thing to a friend of hers who was also a patient. The problem there is that we can't confirm or deny that story, because that patient was killed in a car accident last year.

It doesn't really matter anymore, I guess. What's done is done, what's said has been said, and I decided over a month ago that I'd be opening my own establishment soon anyway--strictly chair massage. Nice and safe. I'll be gone from the chiro before April, and out of medical massage for good. It's just not worth it anymore.
Nemo liber est qui corpori servit.

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Post by mtnlionz » Wed Jan 30, 2008 2:41 pm

I'm really sorry to hear of this event, knightshade. I admire you for taking the afternoon away from the office to take care of yourself (and I admire the DC for making it easy for you to do so). Please keep us posted with how it unfolds and how you are doing. I think it's safe to say you will find lots of support here.

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Post by BlackSwanMassage » Wed Jan 30, 2008 4:32 pm

Thanks, lion. Everyone else seems content to let it drop (including the mother, who is not pursuing any further action), and can't understand why I'm still upset. Then again, none of them understand because none of them are LMT's. Out of all of the people involved, the one who understands the most is my chiro.

This woman's baseless accusations could have caused me to lose my shot at starting my own business--a dream of mine since I started school--a mere month before I could bring it all to fruition. I think I have a right to be upset for at least a day or so, don't I?
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Post by Gaspen » Wed Jan 30, 2008 5:25 pm

I'm sorry this happened. I truly hope that nothing more comes of it. Unfortunately, there's not much you can do to protect yourself. There are 'possible' options, but not really good ones. Good luck in your chair massage business.
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Post by sjidoulamt » Thu Jan 31, 2008 4:18 am

Sorry to hear this happened, Knightshade. Sounds pretty baseless if she is not willing to pursue it. And you have every right to be upset. Please don't let this throw you off your business pursuits.

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Post by Rose of Sharon » Thu Jan 31, 2008 7:18 am

Of course you are upset!! I'm sorry. Good luck on your next endeavor.
Sharon

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Post by Breathe » Thu Jan 31, 2008 9:03 am

I just heard yesterday about a false allegation made against an MT friend. Client (male) claimed that he paid for a package and had one session. Then he claimed that MT (male) wouldn't return his phone calls to make another appt,. and wouldn't refund his money. MT never got any phone calls to schedule another appt, and the first he heard of a request to refund, was when he was contacted by the board for a misconduct hearing, and a fine in excess of $2K for "misconduct."

Here's the outcome: The Board, even though they could find no evidence of wrongdoing, or violation of law, still fined him $500 "so he could keep his license."

How's that for bullpoopy?



EDITED because pueppi is a smart cookie.
Last edited by Breathe on Fri Feb 01, 2008 3:31 pm, edited 1 time in total.
abusing the word "actually" since 1973

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Post by Convoluted » Thu Jan 31, 2008 1:19 pm

I would be very upset if I experienced something like that!!!

We are here for you! :smt056

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Post by pueppi » Fri Feb 01, 2008 9:25 am

Breathe wrote: <Removed quote per edit by Breathe>
Hope someone doesn't read this quote and go running with that idea.
Last edited by pueppi on Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:01 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Post by Empathic~Heart » Fri Feb 01, 2008 5:29 pm

Breathe wrote:EDITED because pueppi is a smart cookie.
Now she needs to edit HER post that quoted your edit!

Knightshade - sorry you're dealing with this, and of course you are upset. Your integrity has been called into question, regardless of them pursuing charges or not. :roll:

How old was this "daughter"? IME - younger "women" (i.e. older teens) are often intimidated and embarrassed by gluteal work. I've been doing massage for 16 years, both as a PT Assistant and an LMT and very familiar with medical massage. Please don't let one claim change your course of career choice. If you *want* to work on the more medical side of things, please be assured that these situations are far more the exception than the norm.
Last edited by Empathic~Heart on Sat Feb 02, 2008 12:59 pm, edited 1 time in total.

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Post by softhearted515 » Fri Feb 01, 2008 5:37 pm

This is a really crappy situation. I hope it doesn't prevent you from continuing to do what you love.

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Post by BlackSwanMassage » Fri Feb 01, 2008 5:58 pm

This is really just the nail in the coffin as far as the medical massage goes. I'm not saying I'll never do any therapeutic work on a client, but I'm not going to actively seek that field as anything close to an exclusive form of gainful employment. I don't think it's in me to NEVER help someone get rid of a headache, for example.

I'm just glad that everything is falling into place for my business. The AMTA is being extremely accommodating in altering my insurance certificate to include the property owner to satisfy the requirements of the mall manager, my refund will be here from the IRS on the 12th, and I can use it to get the application in for my establishment license. Close on its heels will be my fiancee's refund, which will be used for...well, pretty much everything else. It'll cost me a grand total of about $1,500-$2,000 to get the business started, including 1st month's rent.

By mid-March, I'll be gone from the chiro's, the Good Lord willin' and the creek don't rise (as my granddaddy used to say...)

Thanks for your support, and I think I'll make it through the rest of this month. Keep your fingers crossed for me! You guys are the best!
Nemo liber est qui corpori servit.

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Post by pueppi » Sat Feb 02, 2008 7:03 am

Empathic~Heart wrote:
Breathe wrote:EDITED because pueppi is a smart cookie.
Now he needs to edit HIS post that quoted your edit!
*chuckles* Done... and if you'll notice, my icon is a girl dancing smiley, not a boy-one. :)

=====================================
After this brief intermission we are back to the thread in progress.
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
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Post by Empathic~Heart » Sat Feb 02, 2008 12:59 pm

pueppi wrote:
Empathic~Heart wrote:
Breathe wrote:EDITED because pueppi is a smart cookie.
Now she needs to edit HER post that quoted your edit!
*chuckles* Done... and if you'll notice, my icon is a girl dancing smiley, not a boy-one. :)

=====================================
After this brief intermission we are back to the thread in progress.
:oops: My bad! I don't typically check avs for gender identification...dunno why! ;)

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Post by StephenCMT » Sun Feb 03, 2008 10:56 pm

Unfortunately, "wake-up call" is a fairly accurate description and I'm sorry you had to go through something like this. Take it from me when I say that you're not alone by any means and need to understand that some people are capable of doing petty things to suit their own ends. Exploiting vulnerability to achieve what you want is an all too common practice anymore whether it be a client, co-worker, or former employer. And, as Massage Therapists, we have the " Cinemax Late Night 'Masseuse' " stigma to deal with as well as being a Male to boot. People can try to act like the stigma isn't there, but it simply is...just like any other types of prejudice in the world be it sexism, racism, etc...

The question is: what do you do about it? Do you act like the situation is not there? Do you just leave it alone and avoid it? Do you let it continue to anger you until you finally speak out against it or 'turn the other cheek' and let it worry you from the back of your mind? I asked myself the same questions when a shady co-worker who was fired did everything she could to get back at me and an employer. Ultimately, I decided to fight back no matter what the cost and ended up making her look like the fool she is and increased my reputation with the other MT's in the area...including changing the minds of several female MT's that jumped on the lynching bandwagon just because I was a guy.

My advice? Don't back down from this. Call your trusted colleagues and get advice as to how to handle this. She may officially "let it go", but shady people never pass up an opportunity to spread a little mischief. Word of mouth can follow a practitioner no matter what type of practice they may run. Don't let this become a cloud hanging over you. Find a way to legally shut her up as cost-efficient as possible and then learn your lessons from the experience. Don't let one shady person turn you into a cynic. You can ALWAYS be aware of the negativity of human nature without having to embrace it. Once you take this to heart, you can truly rise above it. Because awareness truly is the first step in prevention.

Best of luck to you. If you have any questions, feel free to PM me.
Stephen Hartswick, CMT
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Post by NaplesLMT » Thu Mar 06, 2008 4:09 pm

I have been there....a spa setting. I think that any male therapist will have this happen sooner or later. It is really out of our control no matter how "careful" or "professional" we are. It is the client and not you!!!
It is very traumatic when it happens to you. I felt victimized. Keep your chin up!!

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Post by Spock » Thu Mar 06, 2008 9:29 pm

A friend of mine who was accused of inappropriate sexual conduct. He had a people write letters vouching for his person and professionalism. Some of them also knew the clients erratic behavior and noted that in the letters, so it called her motives into question and the letters were so powerful, when the client's lawyer got them, they dropped the case.

Perhaps that is something you can do?
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Post by happyfingers » Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:02 pm

Open question... how do we guard against this happening to each of us? Getting verbal consent when we release something like a piriformis is easy but sounds to me that this didn't make any difference. Surely not written or signed consent? Thoughts?

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Post by Rose of Sharon » Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:11 pm

happyfingers wrote:Open question... how do we guard against this happening to each of us? Getting verbal consent when we release something like a piriformis is easy but sounds to me that this didn't make any difference. Surely not written or signed consent? Thoughts?

Henry
The problem with false allegations is that they are lies. You just can't foresee every possible lie, much less protect yourself from it, other than having video equipment in the room and each client looking into it giving consent to also be taped. Men definitely run into more risk of these issues, and it stinks.

The piriformis can easily be released through the sheet, so working that way may offer a bit more protection. That will ease the minds of the more nervous/prone to feel invaded clients. But those who decide to make a false claim are usually motivated by money, and if they are willing to lie, your best defense is for many others to know your work, very good session notes that include client responses (verbal especially), and impeccable ethics in all other areas.

Our insurance is so inexpensive, though, because there are very rarely any claims against us as a whole. *Those* clients are the noisy ones, but they are not many in number.
Sharon

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Post by happyfingers » Wed Mar 26, 2008 12:13 pm

Well put. Thanks Sharon.
x
H

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Re: False Allegations...

Post by An NOn » Tue May 25, 2010 10:46 am

As franchise massage businesses become more common, I think you'll see an increase in false allegations of sexual misconduct, from inappropriate boundaries to intercourse, especially when the massage therapist is male and the client is female.

Educate yourself!

Anytime there are allegations involving something sexual going on in your massage room, you open yourself up to criminal and civil penalties including loss of your reputation, license, career, and even prison time.

To see how common a problem false allegations are generally, see:

False Rape Society http://falserapesociety.blogspot.com

False Allegations: An Assault on Justice http://www.theforensicexaminer.com/archive/spring09/15/

Dr. Demosthenes Lorandos' series of videos for those accused falsely http://www.youtube.com/user/AccusedFalsely#g/u

Victimized by “Victims:” A Taxonomy of Antecedents of False Complaints Against Psychotherapists False Allegations http://www.drmwilliams.com/SAdocs/victim.html

The Spine Guru http://thespineguru.com/Mentoring.html

In massage practice, you need to pay particular attention to women and (rarely) men that have fibromyalgia or similar somatoform disorders as some of them have co-occuring personality disorders (borderline, histrionic, etc.). You may even want to ask them if they have been treated for such psych disorders or look at their medication list for clues as part of your client intake. In my practice, if they have these diagnoses, I refuse treatment.

Take a look at the work of Randy Sansone, M.D.
Chapter VIII - Fibromyalgia and Borderline Personality: Theoretical Perspectives; pp. 127-141 (Randy A. Sansone and Lori A. Sansone, Wright State University School of Medicine, U.S.A.)
https://www.novapublishers.com/catalog/ ... ts_id=4550


You may also want to Google "fibromyalgia and borderline personality disorder" http://www.google.com/search?q=fibromya ... y+disorder

Borderline Distortion Campaigns: http://angiemedia.com/2008/12/29/bpd-di ... campaigns/
(this should scare you, and rightfully so)

Other resources:
Common Traits & Behaviors of Personality-Disordered Individuals http://www.outofthefog.net/CommonBehaviors.html
Borderline personality disorder http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Borderline ... y_disorder
Munchausen's Syndrome http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Munchausens_syndrome
Coping with BPD Loved Ones http://web.archive.org/web/200306062353 ... oping.html
Tri-Polar Personality Disorder http://tri-polar.net/
Welcome to BPDCentral! http://www.bpdcentral.com/index.php
Persuasive Blamers http://www.bpd411.org/persuasiveblamers.html

I only perform chair massage out in the open or I have a massage chaperone when doing full body massage. Don't trust any of your clients and protect yourself. The stigma of false allegations can ruin your life permanently.

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Re: False Allegations...

Post by JasonE » Tue May 25, 2010 5:23 pm

You only do public chair massage, or have a "chaperone" whenever doing full body massage??? :shock:

This is your first post on these forums, and you've packed in a LOT of specific information, links, and strongly worded cautions.

What's your story?
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Re: False Allegations...

Post by An NOn » Tue May 25, 2010 9:42 pm

JasonE wrote:You only do public chair massage, or have a "chaperone" whenever doing full body massage??? :shock:

This is your first post on these forums, and you've packed in a LOT of specific information, links, and strongly worded cautions.

What's your story?

My story is not important other than I am following the advice of my fellow male medical professional friends who have "chaperones" present when they perform procedures on female patients/clients because it is required by the facilities that they work for, or it is part of their strategies for minimizing litigation. According to their attorneys, there have been important changes in rape shield laws in the past 10 years in many states that extend the definition of rape and that violate US Constitutional guarantees such as equal protection and due process that all massage therapists (especially the males) should know about. Do yourself a favor and take the couple of weeks it will take to read the papers and other information at the sites I've listed, you'll understand the significance, and why you may want to consider doing what I do in my practice. What you'll find is that it's rather like the movie The Matrix -- take the red pill and see for yourself. Obliviousness is not bliss.

Example peek into Wonderland:

http://www.falsely-accused.net/rape-cases.php
Rape Cases & False Accusations

Rape is a criminal allegation that is easy to claim and increasingly difficult for a defendant to disprove. For decades, the crime of rape has been known as the easiest criminal allegation to make by the alleged victim and the hardest to disprove by the defendant.

In the 1960s, the victims of this brutal crime were able to take advantage of significant changes in the law that made it easier to obtain convictions and justice. Unfortunately, these changes also made it easier for those who were falsely accused of rape to be convicted as well. Adding to the defendant’s difficulties is the controversial “Rape Trauma Syndrome,” a psychological theory that has been rejected by behavioral science. Unfortunately, this idea is still being used by prosecutors and junk science witnesses as so-called evidence in cases alleging the crime of rape.

A series of bias laws are making it easier to obtain convictions.

Jury Instructions

Courts have long known that rape is an easy allegation to make but one that is hard to disprove. In fact, the biggest threat of being falsely accused of a crime was that of being accused of rape (until child molestation became a significant national issue, flooding the legal system with cases). Courts perceived the potential threat of false allegations of rape and fashioned jury instructions to inform members of the jury that such allegations were easy to make by the complainant but difficult for the defendant to disprove.

Today, in most states, this jury instruction is no longer allowed to be given as a result of changes in the law; changes that also mandate giving a very different set of instructions.

In many states, the judge now informs the jury that:

(1) an allegation of rape does not require any evidence of corroboration;
(2) there is no requirement for medical evidence;
(3) there is no requirement for DNA evidence; and
(4) there is no requirement for a second witness.

In short, there the only requirement for a conviction is the bare allegation made by a complainant. Even the manner in which the jury is selected is tainted with this attitude that evidence does not matter. In many states, prosecutors can demand that during the selection process, each prospective juror must agree that he/she would not require corroboration of a crime. If the juror disagrees with this demand, he/she can be excused. [ Note: The problem is that there doesn't even need to be sexual involvement at all. As a massage therapist, medical professional, or other professional where you are in a room alone with your client -- just by being alone in the room with your client and performing your duties with all the proper procedures, precautions, draping, disclaimers, signed consent papers, and high moral and ethical standards -- if the client makes a false allegation against you, the bare allegation could be enough to put you in prison due to the way rape laws in many states have been modified. --An ]


Rape Shield Laws

Consensual sex is still legal. Being able to prove consent, however, has become more difficult for the defendant. For example, if a man meets a women at a bar and has sex with her that night, and later she claims that she was raped, the man used to be able to introduce evidence to help establish a pattern of consensual sexual behavior on the woman’s part. That might be the testimony by witnesses that the women routinely comes to the bar every night, engages a man’s companionship, and then goes home and has sexual relations. Such evidence is relevant to show the sex on the night in question was consensual. But it’s not admissible.

Victims’ rights advocates were rightly concerned with legal strategies that put the victim’s personal life on trial. Unfortunately, highly relevant evidence that can protect an innocent defendant is no longer allowed because politics has obscured justice and powerful lobbies have helped to pass what is now called “rape shield laws.” Under the rape shield laws, a defendant in today’s courtroom is forbidden from introducing the prior sexual conduct of the complainant on the issue of consent. Curiously, no one has successfully shown that the evidence of prior sexual conduct is not relevant in determining consent. [ Note: What's worse is that a woman's prior false accusations of sexual assault/misconduct, even if she has made thousands of them and has paid prior legal penalties for making them, are themselves considered sexual acts and are protected by the rape shield laws in some states. -- An ]

While the rape shield laws were intended to encourage more women to come forward and testify, it simply has made it easier to falsely accuse and convict an innocent individual.

Many States also allow the prosecution to introduce allegations made by other women allegedly assaulted on previous occasions by the defendant to prove that a rape occurred in the currently charged offense. In these circumstances, no corroborative evidence is required to introduce these alleged crimes. There does not have to be a conviction. Nor does there have to exist a criminal charge or even a prior police report. The uncorroborated word of a single individual is sufficient.

As you can see, many state legislatures are creating new victims by keeping out the sexual history of the complainant on the issue of consent, and allowing into evidence the sexual history of the defendant. This is shear politics and not based upon relevancy or fair play. This kind of legislation is systematically making it easier to obtain convictions, and while those guilty of rape should be convicted, those who are falsely accused should be allowed to defend themselves adequately in court. [ Note: Have a former girlfriend, an angry client, an ex-wife out for revenge, or someone with a vested interest in harming you for monetary or other gain? Once a person has been accused and it gets to the media, it becomes open season on the accused because of our current moral panic and hysteria regarding sex crimes and sexual offenders. So, besides the first accuser, anyone else could make a false claim against the accused, however outlandish and with no corroborating evidence, and the additional accuser's claim(s) will be accepted by the court as corroborating evidence against the accused in regard to the first accuser's claim. Fortunately, the UK recently passed legislation that will provide anonymity to the accuser and the accused in alleged sex crimes until there is a conviction, which will make it impossible for others to exact revenge or seek advantages by making additional spurious claims. The US, however, will not likely follow the UK's lead. -- An ]


Rape Trauma Syndrome

The members of the jury are the triers of fact. They hear the account of the complainant, and if the defendant elects to testify, they hear the testimony of the defendant. This is the classic “she said, he said” situation in which jury members must decide what they believe is the truth. In an attempt to provide greater credibility to the complainant, and thereby tipping the scales of justice in favor of conviction, Ann Wolbert Burgess and Lynda Lytle Holmstrom wrote a psychological description of what they termed the Rape Trauma Syndrome in 1974.

A syndrome is a constellation of symptoms that when presented by an individual leads to a diagnosis of an illness. First of all, the Rape Trauma Syndrome is not really a syndrome because no diagnosis of rape can be made from the syndrome. Secondly, there was no scientifically controlled study done by behavioral science professionals that supports the theory of Rape Trauma Syndrome.

The fact is that this highly questionable theory is not a recognized syndrome in the DSM-IV-TR. The DSM-IV-TR or Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of the American Psychiatric Association is the current group of recognized diagnoses by behavioral sciences professionals. It includes all of the current, recognized diagnoses and syndromes.

Rape Trauma Syndrome is not in the DSM-IV-TR because it was rejected by the behavioral science community of psychiatrists, psychologists, clinical social workers and others.

One reason Rape Trauma Syndrome is unscientific is that Burgess and Holmstrom assumed that any allegation of rape was true and, on that foundation, devised an explanation for whatever the alleged victim might say or do. It seems their “rape trauma” explanations do not constitute a description of symptoms of an illness, but rather are ways of manipulating evidence in the favor of a complainant.

For example, if a woman recants her story and admits that she was not raped, the prosecution can put a supposed rape trauma expert on the stand to testify that this behavior was “consistent with” being raped. The implication is that the original rape story should be believed. This demonstrates why we refer to the Rape Trauma Syndrome as a confirmatory bias based description. What we mean is that the “syndrome” demonstrates a built-in bias toward confirming that a rape happened. In a process like this, all symptoms lead to the conclusion that “IT HAPPENED.” “Consistent with” testimony from prosecution experts usually illustrates this confirmatory bias.

Our office has never witnessed a so-called Rape Trauma Syndrome expert testify that the complainant’s behavior is also consistent with false allegations of rape. This is true, even though it is widely known and accepted by legitimate researchers in the behavioral sciences. Other descriptions found in the Rape Trauma Syndrome explain that if a woman immediately reports, such action is “consistent with” the typical reactions of a rape victim.

Curiously, this same so-called syndrome explains that if the woman waits for years to report, that is also “consistent with” the typical reactions of a rape victim. The Rape Trauma Syndrome folks also explain that if a women is flirtatious, such behavior is “consistent with” the typical reactions of a rape victim. But if the women is withdrawn, that, too, is “consistent with” the typical reactions of a rape victim. Should the woman cry when testifying, such behavior is “consistent with” the typical reaction of a rape victim. But if a woman doesn’t cry, that is also “consistent with” the typical reaction of a rape victim. The list of descriptions covers almost every conceivable behavior that a human being might have over the course of a lifetime. As you can see, this makes any behavior evidence that supports the charges of an alleged rape victim.

Burgess and Holmstrom’s assumption that all allegations of rape are true is not only unscientific, but dangerous. Such thinking is contrary to the US Constitutional principle that a person is innocent until proven guilty beyond a reasonable doubt.

Rape Trauma Syndrome is not science but the courts in many states have given it legitimacy by allowing the testimony of supposed experts to be heard and by allowing the prosecution to misuse the word “syndrome.” This pseudo-evidence makes it easier to mislead the jury in order to obtain convictions, not just of those who are guilty, but those falsely accused as well.....
So, false allegations of any kind, from inappropriate boundaries to intercourse, are serious matters in the current political, social, and legal climate. I recommend all male massage therapists, medical professionals, and other professionals who spend time behind closed doors with their clients be aware of this particular hazard of their trades and protect themselves. The links I have provided in my prior message are a good place to start.

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Re: False Allegations...

Post by Snackdaddy » Tue Jun 08, 2010 4:01 pm

Long story short, years ago I had a horrible incident of being accused of improper touching of a client. Police investigation and questioning, retained lawyer, the works. Fortunately (?!) the accuser had compromised her credibility to the other staffers even before walking into the massage room. The investigating detective chose to NOT present the case to the county prosecutor for further legal pursuit. Bullet dodged, that time.

So here I am now, considering ramping up my housecall massage endeavors. It gives me the total creeps to think that I might someday face those kinds of accusations again. But ya know, here in the year 2010, there are a lot of available, affordable, authentic ways of digitally videotaping sessions, for incidents like this. And I'm NOT talking here about any kind of "hidden camera" operation (even tho there are a million of those devices to be had). I'm talking about having a hand-held recording device in hand and recording, as I (or you) re-enter the treatment room to start the session. Set it up in place, out in the open, no secrets about it. They can come with audio recording as well, so maybe then is the time to announce the date and time. They also can come with automatic time/date stamping capability.

The placement of the device can easily be such that draping and turning keep privacy intact.

At the end of session, carry the device with you, running, out of the room. Show the client emerging from the room re-dressed.

If I ever have my own massage space/studio, you can bet I'll have a MOUNTED camera, up high at or near the ceiling. When I leave the room, I'll reach up and spin the camera so it faces the door, showing me (from the shoulders up?) leaving the room. The client can disrobe and get on the table in privacy. When I re-enter the room, spin the camera toward the table. Again, draping and turning can be done so as to not compromise privacy. At session end, turn the camera toward the door, and head out. Done.

If there's any question about what exactly happened during the treatemet....... well let's review the tape, shall we? See for yourself, officer. Done.

I undersand that most clients would FREAK at the very mention of "we videotape all sessions!" Maybe that needs to change.
I'm Eric W., in AZ. "Snackdaddy" is too cryptic, but I don't know how to change it.

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GreenDragonfly
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Re: False Allegations...

Post by GreenDragonfly » Tue Jun 08, 2010 4:49 pm

Snackdaddy wrote:
If there's any question about what exactly happened during the treatemet....... well let's review the tape, shall we? See for yourself, officer. Done.

I undersand that most clients would FREAK at the very mention of "we videotape all sessions!" Maybe that needs to change.
I really feel for you, it is horrible to be accused of something you didn't do. I am glad that you 'won' in the end.

I disagree that taping is going to solve any problems of someone who is determined to 'frame' you for something inappropriate. They could change the times, like "oh right after he ended the massage and right after he turned the camera he reached under the drape and blah, blah, blah".

Also, my first gut reaction upon hearing that an MT had ANY kind of electronics in the room besides a music system would be that the camera in view was to take my attention away from some HIDDEN camera someplace else - there by making my mind think that inappropriate things MIGHT be going on that I would otherwise discount, like glute work, pec minor work, ect. It would totally freak me out and here I just heard your story and I BELIEVE you!
Laughter is the best medicine :) It's good for the soul and great for the abs!

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