The worst experiences I have had as a male MT

Discussion area for male practitioners on issues and topics related to their practice.

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Post by Rose of Sharon » Wed Feb 13, 2008 10:03 am

I don't think you were the least bit uncivil or out of line, Shivashiva! I'm sorry I came off as dismissing your point - I don't dismiss it at all. It is an issue in our society on a horribly regular basis. But since this is the "male practioner perspective" forum and it seemed that part of Steve's point was that this is not a service that has ANYTHING to do with sex, and offering gender as an issue to clients seems to make it about sex in some way. The males' concerns were being a bit fluffed over in an attempt to validate an issue that seemed to me to already have been validated. After rereading this thread, I see that it was validated elsewhere - not in this particular thread.

I see a hundred sides to this issue. It's complicated!! There are certain strands that should be very clear, but those are getting muddied.
Sharon

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Post by jacqueline » Wed Feb 13, 2008 10:17 am

excuse me shiva....i never said people thought men were BAD ..they were only uninformed ..please don't lump me in with what you think i meant to defend YOUR position...I was only saying what we did in school and how we dealt with that..I was just not getting heavy into it with how uncomfortable men are with women or what not..i agree some women and or men may be uncomfortable with opposite sex and sometimes for good reason...I was only generalizing..I don't wish to be pulled into your argument....I was only trying to be encouraging in my post to the men..and I think you have every right to your oppinion and I don't fault you for it, but when you made special mention to me, that set me off because I felt attacked when I didnt mean to insult ANYONE

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Post by shivashiva » Wed Feb 13, 2008 10:39 am

Jacqueline, please accept my apology. I did make a general statement and I probably included you wrongly. Here's what I said:
shivashiva wrote: (jacqueline and RoS) both made mention of people
assuming men are "bad" or not as good.
When actually what you said was:
jacqueline wrote:wish people would get over they're "assumptions" and fears of men massage therapists
I was including you in the "assuming" part and I was a bit careless when I made that generalization. I appreciate you clarifying your meaning. I never thought you were insulting anyone. The *only* reason I made special mention of you was to clarify why I felt my position was unsupported, without intending to bring you into the argument.

WHEW! I feel like there have been quite a few minunderstandings in this thread and it seems to be stemming from me....I appreciate your all engaging with me and perhaps tolerating me.
Last edited by shivashiva on Wed Feb 13, 2008 10:40 am, edited 1 time in total.
Shiva
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Post by randypd » Wed Feb 13, 2008 10:40 am

Fascinating discussion. Thanks to all the participants.

I've hit the proverbial jackpot. I'm a male massage therapist. I'm a survivor of childhood sexual and physical abuse. And I've recovered traumatic somatic memories while on the massage table.

When it comes to the issue of workplace discrimination based on gender (or any other protected class be it ethnicity, sexuality, etc...) I believe in following the letter of the law - and then some.

In my view, it is not okay to provide customers a disclaimer that indicates that they are receiving services from a lesser class of human. (BTW, I don't understand how spas get away with posting employment ads for therapists that require the applicant to be female.) Our industry has a LONG way to go! But then, so does our society.

I do understand how a client who is touch sensitive due to a traumatic past would want to have a say in who touches them. That's what private sessions are for. In a clinic, I don't expect to choose my phlebotomist from a line up of prospective humans. I take who I get. Same thing goes for a spa. This issue is bigger than the profit/loss statement for any spa.

I do agree that if someone was told, "You'll be seeing Randy at 2," and they decided they would prefer Janet, that's in their rights. It's just not acceptable for the receptionist to preemptively state. "Is it okay that you'll be with Randy, you know he is male?"

As an industry, we are in a unique position where men - who most will agree have been on the 'privileged' side of the equation historically - are subject to bias. Let's embrace this opportunity to be a beacon for enlightenment.

We must create the world we want. For me, this means it's my responsibility to nonviolently confront discrimination wherever it occurs.



(Anyone up for discussing the additional wrinkles posed by being a gay male therapist? My recent couples massage work has left me feeling negative energy from straight husbands who don't want another man touching their wife and don't want a queer man touching them. What a wonderful opportunity for me to smash a few preconceived fears!)

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Post by Rose of Sharon » Wed Feb 13, 2008 11:04 am

Thanks for your post, Randy! I think that pretty well sums up what most of us are trying to say. You *do* have quite the opportunity to smash some misconceptions!! :lol:
Sharon

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Post by jacqueline » Wed Feb 13, 2008 3:49 pm

Shiva,
apology totally accepted!!!! I guess it's been a bad day and I took offense too easily..I apologize too

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Post by shivashiva » Wed Feb 13, 2008 6:20 pm

Thank you so much for your post Pete. Very eye opening for me.

First, I also agree that Establishments shouldn't use a questioning tone when booking with a certain therapist, like using the phrase "...is that ok?" Totally agree there.

Thank you for pointing out exactly which of my statements were incendiary. That helps me a lot. It helps me see where my own aggression with this does lie.

I will reiterate, hopefully less emphatically, that about 30% of the population have been sexually abused. And this is where my amazement is regarding many of the guys here, particularly Steve acting like they are just being discriminated against across the board and that there is never any reason anyone should not want a massage from a man.

That is why I keep saying it. There is a reason. And I'm not saying all the people who were abused were done so by a man. And I'm purely speculating here, but most of us have had experiences of nurturing and love with a female (even if they were abused by a female). But I think many who were abused by men perhaps never had a nurturing experience with a man. ??? Therefore why more people can accept nurturing touch from a female but not a male.

I also think most people either are not conscious of their aversion to massage from a man, or are not conscious of the abuse. But I don't think people are necessarily thinking "My uncle molested me, therefore I am uncomfortable with men touching me, so I don't want a massage from a man." Instead, it's mostly unconscious. They get a man walking up saying "Hi, I'm Jim, I'm your massage therapist." They just freak. And they don't know why.

I do see that I made some blunt and rude statements in this thread and I wish now I had phrased things differently. I sometimes post hastily, when I'm feeling passionate about what I'm writing.

I hope I've explained why I was so "pushy." I still believe, that men seem to take it too personally and get offended, when it's really about the client. And fact is you have no idea what has happened to them in their life.

When someone, anyone, acts mean or snappy or apathetic, or rejecting, we tend to put the blame on them. But usually, they have layers of issues under there. We can't blame clients as being "discriminatory" for not wanting a massage from a male.

I have a friend who practices Crainiosacral Therapy for people recovering from addiction. He first practiced massage with people recovering from addiction and found most of the time it was too intense and boundary blurring because most of the women had suffered abuse in the past and took issue with him, being a male. He switched to CST because it was less invasive, less all-over touching, more subtle work. And still very effective.
Shiva
O friend, understand. / The body is like the ocean, rich with hidden treasures. / Open your innermost chamber / And light its lamp - Mirabai
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Post by Blisss » Wed Feb 13, 2008 7:05 pm

I used to think it was fine for massage therapy practices to get approval before booking a client with a male MT. I saw it as simple customer service. Now, after reading the men's responses on this thread, I have been convinced otherwise. So thanks to all you guys for enlightening me :smt006 . I agree that this behavior ends up reinforcing negative stereotypes, instead of dispelling them. Clients always have the right to make requests, and those should be honored. But the facility shouldn't assume a problem in advance.

Shivashiva, I don't know if you've ever heard of the "Invisible Knapsack." It's the theory that caucasians carry around a metaphorical knapsack of privilege that they don't even know they have. It makes it hard for them to empathize with the challenges faced daily by people of color. In the massage therapy field, we women have the invisible knapsack. Instead of telling our male peers that they shouldn't be offended, maybe we should listen to them and honor their experience.

I know you feel passionately about the tragedy of sexual abuse in this country. Maybe you will be led to specialize in that field yourself? As for this thread, I think your emphasis on sexual assault victims oversimplifies the issue. There are numerous reasons someone might be uncomfortable with a male massage therapist. Like you said in your last post, "The fact is you have no idea what has happened to them in their life." So let's all stop jumping to conclusions.

Lastly, regarding your friend who specializes in CST. I hope you aren't suggesting that male massage therapists in general give up massage and switch to CST. I would never want male massage therapists to feel limited in their scope of practice. I've received a wide range of excellent bodywork from both men & women. It's the skill I look for, not the gender. I would like to see a time, when all facilities operated from that premise.

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Post by shivashiva » Wed Feb 13, 2008 7:21 pm

Thank you both Bliss and Pete for your replies!

I am especially thankful Bliss for your mentioning the "invisible knapsack" concept. And believe me. I have been thinking A LOT about this thread. It's really consuming my mind right now. And I'm sure it's not hard to see (obviously) that it's really hard for me to "get" how you guys are being discriminated against. I can't say I've fully gotten it yet. But this Invisible Knapsack concept I think will help me as I contemplate it in the days to come.

I also want to say that I am NOT SUGGESTING AT ALL (caps. hehee) that male therapists in general should give up massage and switch to CST. I know many GREAT male therapists, and I wouldn't want them to change. This therapist was a recovered addict himself and wanted to specialize in Female (I think) recovering addicts. He just found that time and time again, his gender got in the way of truly helping them. And so he decided to switch. I totally acknowledge that this is an Example and does not apply to everyone (these are all recovering addicts, almost 100% abused). Could have had to do with him (big guy) or his client base, or who knows what.

Again, I understand the discrimination thing and establishments saying "is it okay?" That's totally not okay. I'd be very interested in specializing in abuse work, Bliss. Actually, thanks for the suggestion. I had been thinking about volunteering at my local women's shelter, and perhaps I will pursue that.
Steve's point about substituting "male" with "latino" or "asian" etc. was never addressed.
I do want to address the ethnicity thing vs. gender thing. I think that is what I have been addressing all along. By saying that this is not a civil rights issue I have been saying that it is totally different. I spoke about what the issues were with discriminating against ethnic folks vs. this issue and how it was different. I so far think they are totally different things.

I'm open to new things and won't it be humbling when I realize that ya'll are being put down by the man (or woman in this case.) But I don't see it yet.

I see that many of us (men and women) have been abused through touch by many of us (men and women) and this is one result. I don't think spas should ask "is it okay?"
Shiva
O friend, understand. / The body is like the ocean, rich with hidden treasures. / Open your innermost chamber / And light its lamp - Mirabai
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Post by palpable » Wed Feb 13, 2008 9:05 pm

I will second the point that MANY job openings for MTs will state in the ads that they want a FEMALE therapist, and many more will not even talk to a male MT. That is discrimination.

This is from the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission:
It is unlawful to discriminate against any employee or applicant for employment because of his/her sex in regard to hiring, termination, promotion, compensation, job training, or any other term, condition, or privilege of employment. Title VII also prohibits employment decisions based on stereotypes and assumptions about abilities, traits, or the performance of individuals on the basis of sex. Title VII prohibits both intentional discrimination and neutral job policies that disproportionately exclude individuals on the basis of sex and that are not job related.
http://www.eeoc.gov/types/sex.html

...and yet it happens all the time in hiring practices in the massage field.

I don't think anyone is negating the fact that a significant number of massage clients have potentially suffered abusive situations, nor do I think anyone is saying that a client does not have every right to choose their MT based on any premise they want- gender, personality, whatever.

What I do believe we male MTs are trying to express is that there is a lot of discrimination in this field.

As for scheduling clients, I like this scenario:

Client: "Hi, I would like to schedule a massage."
Clinic: "Great! We have an opening at 3 on Thursday with Tom, or at noon on Friday with Jenny."
Move on as quickly as you can to people who get you and what you do. -Robert Chute

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Post by Rose of Sharon » Wed Feb 13, 2008 9:19 pm

Yeeeeesh!!

Okay........Shiva has said repeatedly that establishments should NOT put a negative spin on having a massage by a male. There should not be a "you're booked with a man, is that okay?" She *is* championing the woman's right to choice, but honestly, nobody is disagreeing with that! There isn't an argument, yet the arguing continues... aren't we supposed to be relaxing each other instead of stirring junk up?

Everyone in this thread has agreed that clients have a right to their issues, and have a right to request a specific MT or even a specific gender. Nobody is criticizing the client for having issues....many of us are suggesting we should at least TRY to reeducate clients and *show* them their prejudices, but NOBODY is trying to force a client to comply. Nobody is even upset with the clients for their prejudices. This thread is about ESTABLISHMENTS discriminating against hiring and/or scheduling male MT's. This is the Male Practitioner's Perspective forum....it's not supposed to be the girls vs. guys forum.....

Guys are discriminated against in our field. They are. Placing an ad that says "females only need apply" is sexual discrimination. There is no possible way around that fact. Not every individual who wants to see one gender over the other is practicing sexism or discrimination, but the guys are not suggesting that they are. The issue the men on this board have is with hiring discrimination and with scheduling discrimination. Those are valid issues. The rest of the stuff here is just muddying the waters. And they are the *guys* waters.....not ours to muddy. ;)
Sharon

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Post by Rose of Sharon » Wed Feb 13, 2008 9:30 pm

Again, Palpable.....you say it so much more succinctly than I do! :lol: Sorry, we were posting at the same time - it just took me half a week....I wasn't TRYING to repeat you ... in a foreign language... :? :oops:
Sharon

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Post by palpable » Wed Feb 13, 2008 9:34 pm

Rose of Sharon wrote:Again, Palpable.....you say it so much more succinctly than I do! :lol: :
You would recant that if you had to listen to one of my rambling messages on your answering machine. :lol:
Move on as quickly as you can to people who get you and what you do. -Robert Chute

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Wait - isn't this area for male practitioners?

Post by BJB-LMP » Thu Feb 14, 2008 8:20 am

shivashiva wrote:I'm open to new things and won't it be humbling when I realize that ya'll are being put down by the man (or woman in this case.) But I don't see it yet.
Respectfully Shiva, I gotta ask -- who cares if you (or I) see it, in this section of the forum? I mean this section is called "The Male Practitioner's Perspective." I feel strongly that this area of the forum is supposed to be a safe space for men in the profession to be able to work out what is particular to their experience. You're not the only one woman who has been on this thread (now I'm on it too dang it), and I understand about not feeling heard, but frankly I feel like this is not the place to insist on a woman's viewpoint being heard.

In fact as a board I think we really need to reclarify the purpose of this forum area, and as a group I would love to see us re-commit to making this a safe space for male practitioners. So if something in a thread like this makes one of us gals feel like she really has something to say, why not make a spinoff thread in another area of the board? We women can listen to our male colleagues, let them know they've been heard. While disagreement is natural and normal, picking apart a male practitioner's experience and telling him how he should interpret it, are IMO inappropriate in TMPP.

I know no harm was meant, but harm has been done, in this and other instances. And unless we as a board are committed to really hearing what men are experiencing in our profession, this is going to keep happening in here.

If you guys (the actual guys) disagree w/this, of course everybody keep on.
-Beccy

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Post by shivashiva » Thu Feb 14, 2008 9:21 am

Thank you, BJB-LMP. I had not thought that it wasn't appropriate for me to be arguing my piece on this section of the forum. I guess I wrongly interpreted "The Male Practitioner's Perspective" as "A place to talk about men in massage therapy" and once again I generalized in what turned out to be a harmful way, and I apologize for that.

Let me preface what remains of my post by saying it will be my last post in this thread, and if I feel compelled to continue this conversation, I will start a thread elsewhere (or revive an old one!). But let me put in a few closing thoughts so I can respond to what has been said.

I *don't* think I am espousing a woman's point of view. Just because I am a woman doesn't make this a feminist viewpoint. There are men who have been abused (by men and women) who will have a problem getting massage from men. It may look like homophobia sometimes, but isn't always.

Also, I think *I* at least have maybe been having a different argument than the rest of you. I have never questioned or argued against that there is discrimination in the workplace regarding getting hired, and how the receptionist treats men, etc. When I said: "The reason it is not a civil rights issue is because men are not being discriminated against." I meant that when a person refuses to have a massage with a man, *that* is when they are not being discriminated against.

CERTAINLY in the realm of getting a job, or getting the receptionist to talk nice about them, there is discrimination going on. Sharon posted some links up-thread, and here is another thread I checked out which dealt with this issue of discrimination Legal Discrimination in Massage Therapy

I guess what I was hoping to do was bring another element into the discussion, one that people maybe weren't seeing (at least I perceived they weren't seeing)...In the beginning of the thread I was getting the impression that men couldn't understand why someone might be horrified (with the exception of holisitichealer (Rob) who put it very well and very succinctly), and I was using sexual abuse to explain that.

I appreciate everyone who has commented, both supporting me and challenging me. This thread has really helped open my mind and has taught me a lot about posting on the forums!
Shiva
O friend, understand. / The body is like the ocean, rich with hidden treasures. / Open your innermost chamber / And light its lamp - Mirabai
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Post by EgoMagickian » Sat Feb 16, 2008 12:40 am

I meant that when a person refuses to have a massage with a man, *that* is when they are not being discriminated against.

Um.

Discrimination: treatment or consideration of, or making a distinction in favor of or against, a person or thing based on the group, class, or category to which that person or thing belongs rather than on individual merit.

You seem to want to justify/rationalize this discrimination as somehow... well, justified and rational... but since gender and ability to do massage have just about zero correlation, one will be hard pressed to come up with any reasons that aren't personal.

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Post by boofdorf » Wed Feb 20, 2008 4:10 pm

"Discussion area for male practitioners on issues and topics related to their practice."
-From the description of this section.

It was not easy to get this section started on this board and I'm dismayed to see a regular male member decide to leave the board following a discussion here. :(
BJB-LMP wrote: Respectfully Shiva, I gotta ask -- who cares if you (or I) see it, in this section of the forum? I mean this section is called "The Male Practitioner's Perspective." I feel strongly that this area of the forum is supposed to be a safe space for men in the profession to be able to work out what is particular to their experience. You're not the only one woman who has been on this thread (now I'm on it too dang it), and I understand about not feeling heard, but frankly I feel like this is not the place to insist on a woman's viewpoint being heard.

In fact as a board I think we really need to reclarify the purpose of this forum area, and as a group I would love to see us re-commit to making this a safe space for male practitioners. So if something in a thread like this makes one of us gals feel like she really has something to say, why not make a spinoff thread in another area of the board? We women can listen to our male colleagues, let them know they've been heard. While disagreement is natural and normal, picking apart a male practitioner's experience and telling him how he should interpret it, are IMO inappropriate in TMPP.

I know no harm was meant, but harm has been done, in this and other instances. And unless we as a board are committed to really hearing what men are experiencing in our profession, this is going to keep happening in here.

If you guys (the actual guys) disagree w/this, of course everybody keep on.
Actually, BJB, I couldn't agree with you more!!!
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Post by pueppi » Fri Feb 22, 2008 7:04 am

boofdorf wrote:"Discussion area for male practitioners on issues and topics related to their practice."
-From the description of this section.

It was not easy to get this section started on this board and I'm dismayed to see a regular male member decide to leave the board following a discussion here. :(
BJB-LMP wrote: Respectfully Shiva, I gotta ask -- who cares if you (or I) see it, in this section of the forum? I mean this section is called "The Male Practitioner's Perspective." I feel strongly that this area of the forum is supposed to be a safe space for men in the profession to be able to work out what is particular to their experience. You're not the only one woman who has been on this thread (now I'm on it too dang it), and I understand about not feeling heard, but frankly I feel like this is not the place to insist on a woman's viewpoint being heard.

In fact as a board I think we really need to reclarify the purpose of this forum area, and as a group I would love to see us re-commit to making this a safe space for male practitioners. So if something in a thread like this makes one of us gals feel like she really has something to say, why not make a spinoff thread in another area of the board? We women can listen to our male colleagues, let them know they've been heard. While disagreement is natural and normal, picking apart a male practitioner's experience and telling him how he should interpret it, are IMO inappropriate in TMPP.

I know no harm was meant, but harm has been done, in this and other instances. And unless we as a board are committed to really hearing what men are experiencing in our profession, this is going to keep happening in here.

If you guys (the actual guys) disagree w/this, of course everybody keep on.
Actually, BJB, I couldn't agree with you more!!!
It is sad that a member left. Over the years, people have left the forums for all sorts of reasons.

Shivashiva may never be able to explain in writing what she was trying to say, but I don't think she had bad intentions or ideas in mind, even if it may have come across in a way that was not understood.

Steve is more than old enough to make a decision - he's grown up and knows that there are going to be conflicts, saw that there were others that backed him up, and I'm sure he is capable of knowing that he can always come back and post when he is ready to do so. No one ran him off, he chose to leave.

One thing that has made the Male Perspectives section flourish (in my opinion) is that women also responded to threads. As a matter of fact, part of starting this section was searching out and moving male therapist related threads to this area from the general BWOL forums. But, seeing the above responses from boofdorf and BJB-LMP, I know where I'm not wanted and I won't post in the "Male Perspective's" again unless opinions change.

The benefit of this thread: I know where I am wanted on the forums. Not in the Male Perspective's Section. Is that discrimination? No. I am just not wanted.
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Post by palpable » Fri Feb 22, 2008 7:42 am

I have no issue with female MTs posting in this section. Actually, I think it adds to the perspective *ducking for cover*.
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the spin on this thread

Post by HappyKarma » Fri Feb 22, 2008 9:34 am

Thank you Pete! I have been looking at this thread for a while now,and I am pissed! I already am a double minority,being both African-American and male,and believe me I have had my share of negativity aimed at me since beginning my MT career.Shiva's comments only have helped me to see us males will always be beat down,and thats sad, because we have worked just as hard as the females here to get our licenses and start out careers--we need a place for OUR free expression without feeling attacked. My thing is---you either want my services or you do not--plain and simple! I have PLENTY of clients who keep rebooking,as I must be doing something right!

:smt013 Arggh!
Johnny
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Post by moogie » Fri Feb 22, 2008 7:06 pm

FWIW, I didn't perceive any of the posts as meaning that women aren't welcome to post in this section. My take on it is that we should keep in mind that this is the "male's perspective" and to try to see things from their point of view.

Angie

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Post by Gaspen » Fri Feb 22, 2008 8:36 pm

Being a male and a therapist, I welcome everyone (even female counterparts) to put your collective or singular comments in this area! :)
Glad ta meetcha...I'm your handy man.
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Post by pueppi » Mon Feb 25, 2008 9:18 am

Pete wrote:Pueppi, et al...

I hope you can relate since you seem hurt by your own (mis)perception that you are not welcome in this section.
Pete,

Thank you for infoming me of my "mis-perception".

My personal opinion is that there have been more than one mis-perception (as you put it) related to this thread. One thing for certain, I am not hurt in the least, so don't fret. But, I will keep that word in mind for future reference.

See you on another forum here at BWOL :smt039 .
May your trails be crooked, winding, lonesome, leading to the most amazing view. May your rivers flow without end, meandering through valleys tinkling with bells...
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Re: The worst experiences I have had an a male MT

Post by michiganMT » Thu Jun 19, 2008 2:06 pm

PainFree Musician wrote:
thegreatone wrote:

My response would have been, "Well, then you must sleep very well if I'm your worst nightmare. I'm an insomniac and my nightmares usually involve mutant chickens, flaming carrots and space aliens. Shall we proceend now?"

I don't know if I could have hid my sense of humor with that one.

rofil! i think we should be friends.

AaronN
Fresh Hands
Posts: 7
Joined: Tue Sep 02, 2008 9:05 am
Location: San Jose, CA

Post by AaronN » Tue Sep 02, 2008 10:22 am

I don't know if this thread is still watched or not, but it's definitely interesting. :)

I am also a gay male MT. The gay part never factors into my work. My coworkers know (and don't care) and a few of my regulars do, but it's honestly a non issue. I have enough judgment that if, for example, I have a client on the table who says, "Aaron... that's the brother of Moses," then the whole gay thing gets shelved. They don't need, or want to know. :)

I knew from the beginning that being a male therapist would be harder than being a female. There are certain preconceptions about us that are difficult to break. So, I decided to use it to my advantage instead! Clients assume that women cannot use as deep pressure as men. We all know this isn't correct, and I take every opportunity to inform my clients of this, but I still focus a lot on deep work and it works very well for me, since it's always been an interest of mine.

I would like to re-touch on that polarizing issue that this threat was started on - specifically, the way that receptionists sometimes book client. I know for a fact that some people won't want a male therapist, and that's their choice. There are many, many reasons why that could be, whether it be abuse, the thought that having a man work on a man is 'gay', whatever, it really doesn't matter. What DOES matter, in my opinion, is the way the receptionists state the matter. Here are some examples.

"Is it okay if I book you with one of our male therapists?"

That one is wrong. By asking it as a question, the receptionist implies that someone may not want a male therapist. I think the key here is to not provide any additional openings for a client to refuse a male. If they have strong feelings on the subject, they'll state them.

"Okay, I have you booked with Aaron at 2:00. Do you have any questions?"

Here, the receptionist states my name and gives the opportunity for the client to say anything they need to say without nudging them in one direction or the other. I think this is the best way to do it. Now, because my name can be either a male or a female's name (Erin, and both sound the same on the phone), maybe some clarification could be needed.

"Okay, I have you booked with Aaron, one of our male therapists, at 2:00. Do you have any questions?"

I'd rather they didn't even have to go this far, because they're still specifying a specific group that I belong to. If my name was Jack, or Bill, or Steve, it wouldn't be an issue at all. But this way, the client won't be surprised one way or the other when they arrive for their appointment.

Either way, that's just my two cents. :)

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