In-home spa treatments

Discussion of treatments including, but not limited to: muds, masks, parafango, waxing, hydrotherapy, facials, thallasotherapy, dermabrasion, etc. Popular topics will be given their own forum upon request.

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Masthera
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In-home spa treatments

Post by Masthera » Mon Mar 13, 2006 9:27 am

I am posting this on behalf of a friend to get your input. I don't know much about providing spa treatments - so I thought it would be good to post this here. Here is a copy of the email. I am going to refer her here.
My niece, who is doing massage, has been doing in-home massages and pampering parties as she calls them, where people get their hands and feet pampered, reflexology, and several other things, depening on how much they want to spend. She doesn't have a place of business, nor does her insurance allow her to do anything at her home. So she either goes to people's homes, or has some connections with several of the Curves in the area. She's been thinking about expanding her packages to include the following:

In-Home Spa Treaments, includes:

1. Body mud wraps
2. Exfoliation salt scrubs
3. Hydrating lotion treatments
4. Full-body massage afterwards

Approximate cost $300

She asked me if I thought this would be a good idea, before she started buying the stuff.

Is there a market for this?

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Post by SalemRose » Mon Mar 13, 2006 12:10 pm

SOme thoughts off the top of my head......

Well, first off, looking at what she wants to offer....nice. Sounds lovely but $300 bucks! Yikes! I'd start off with some varying packages with a low (but not too low), medium, and high price range. That way potential clients don't get sticker shock! And they feel like they have some options.

Also, mud, can be messy. Clients may not want to worry about any mud spills or drips that may occur. Maybe come up with a differnt type of detox wrap of some sort.....? And of course, I would do the scrub before the wrap.

And as far as washing the mud off in the clients shower......she may want to think about clean up. Does her clean up include not only her stuff but the client tub/shower as well? She'll want to make sure her prices properly compensate her for all that home spa work will entail.

Steph!
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mush
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Post by mush » Mon Mar 13, 2006 12:42 pm

mobile spa services are my specialty. yes, it can be done... even seaweed, clay/mud, salt, sugars ~ not a problem.

i've been taught, however, not to offer more than 1 detoxifying service in one appointment. you can do a scrub (salt/sugar/grommage) and a detox (mud/clay/seaweed) and hydration. more than 1 detox is too much detox.


i package spa services as add-on's to hour or 90 minute massages. i used to offer them a la carte. a service can easily be pared down to 25-35 minutes on its own.

i'm referring to full-body spa services, not hands/feet etc...

good luck to your friend.
and you could be the sunshine falling over the mountains.. john butler
red rocks 9/2005

Masthera
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Post by Masthera » Mon Mar 13, 2006 1:21 pm

Thanks - you both are great!

I will pass on the information.

melb
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Post by melb » Mon Mar 13, 2006 4:25 pm

first thing, if I was going to spend $300, and it took a few hours, I would actually want to go somewhere else, get out of the house. An add-on plus a massage, yeah, I would do that at home, but once you start with things that need to be showered off, I think a lot of people would rather do that in someone else's shower, but your niece is more aware of what her clients want than any of us are. But the more services, the more equipment required to be lugged in, even if the equipment is just extra towels and bowels and a few product jars, add that for each service and it starts filling up the car/van pretty quickly.....

next thing, as far as the pamper party angle, for full body scrubs/wraps you're taking the person out of the party to do it, add a massage and it's why bother with the party at all if people are taken out of it for that long?

Mush is right about you shouldn't do all of those treatments in one service.

Body scrubs on carpet are risky - anything grainy and bits do fly off, there are past posts about sugar scrubs and ants in a treatment room, imagine that in a client's home. I'd suggest dry body brushing rather than a scrub, not quite as effective, and doesn't feel quite as luxurious while it is happening, but follow that with a massage and there is hardly any difference in the results at the end. It's quicker, and minimal clean up compared to a scrub, less linen used. I've found some great sisal body brushes cheaply and just leave the brush with the client, so no cleanup concerns for the brush. People do like knowing that no-one else has used the equipment. They might not think about it at the start, but at the end when you say "you get to keep these" (files, foot file, body brush, etc), they always say "no-one else has given stuff like this", and then you explain it's for their own health, you don't reuse, you can see a light goes on, and they book another appointment.....


Mani/pedi you can do the scrubs/wraps while they are sitting in the party atmosphere, they can be sitting in normal chairs with their feet and hands wraped up while someone else is in the "pedicure chair" getting the scrub done. Body wraps, they're tying up the massage table while they are wrapped.

As far as manicure/pedicure products go I LOVE Creative's RawEarth SpaPedicure http://www.creativenaildesign.com/prod_ ... pa_raw.asp and Spa Manicure http://www.creativenaildesign.com/prod_ ... a_mani.asp - using it and teh resutls. There are professional kits that include most of the extra bits you need to provide the service. The SpaManicure one includes a video for how to use the products, and the traditional SpaPedicure products which you can easily translate to the RawEarth range. (I don't recommend the basic SpaPedicure range - the scrub includes sand - nice idea, but difficult to get off easily, the RawEarth one uses sugar in the scrub so it dissolves as you wipe it off, much easier to handle. I retail a ton of the SpaPedicure Marine Gel, particularly the next time I see them, I apply it and explain how they'll get a cool blast when their feet get a bit sweaty, and the next time I see them it's "my toes got all cool later on when I was walking around. How do I get that stuff?")

I just phrase the manicures as "natural manicure" and say I don't do any maintenance on artifical nails, I have a limited range of nail colours, so suggest people bring their own if they have a particular colour in mind, and I always take nail polish thinner, because most polishes get too gluggy. Creative also have a professional only UV top coat that gives an incredibly hard wearing top coat which people find pretty impressive - a little UV light makes it look all very un-home like

There are quite a few wraps that result in little clean up - particularly the moisturising ones rather than detox ones, detox ones tend to result in drawing out stuff and lots of sweating, and need either a lot of linen to wipe it all off, or to go have a shower, shower you've got to worry about footprints, drips, slipping in shower, tripping on plastic. The moisturing ones, you don't need a hydrating lotion afterwards, and any of the wrap product still left on the skin can be worked in during the massage.

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Post by bodyworker » Tue Mar 14, 2006 2:03 pm

melb,
Are you a nail tech or estetician? Just wondering, I'm an MT and was just curious about you painting the clients nails. I've done hand and feet treatments but done nothing to the nails.
Blue skies,

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Post by melb » Tue Mar 14, 2006 4:06 pm

I an an aromatherapist and MT, currently finishing my estetician qualifications, which do not include artificial nails, but it did cover pedis and manicures. I don't use any blades for cutting off dead skin, I don't use metal tools on the nails, other than toe nail clippers, but most people I see for pedis (usually as an add on to a massage or body treatment) keep their toe nails short enough not to require clipping anyway, so I pretty much can say I don't use any metal instruments. I don't clip cuticles, everything is removed using the pedi/manicure products (AHA serum for softening cuticles, cracked heels, etc means everything can be pushed back or filed off, I just use the pedi files that are sort of like a giant emery board, cheap enough to leave with the client, and they can get a bit more use out of it, orange sticks for the cuticles, emery boards for the nails) I am not penetrating/cutting the skin and so the legeslation that covers skin penetration doesn't come into play. That means, if you can do it, you don't have to have completed a formal qualification to offer the service.

Products from Creative or OPI pretty much do all the work for you, with the softening and dissolving things. Most people I see regularly don't want polish on the nails, hand or feet, but people using a gift certificate usually do. I've found with pamper parties, people are usually happy to paint their own while sitting around chatting, they understand the therapist can then do more of what only the therapist can do, but I will finish their nails with the UV top coat.

The original post mentioned hand and foot treatments, so I provided a lot of details. The RawEarth range is just 4 products: a soak, no skill required; a sugar scrub, depends if a scrub is allowed in scope of practice; a hydrating Sedona mud mask (I usually put that on when they are on the table); and a lotion for a massage. They've got a fairly generic natural smell, but they suggest you can customise them more with essential oils. Those 4 products are all sold as retail products to the general public, so there is not an issue in using them. Heel and cuticle work is done after the soak, and that can be where the professional cuticle remover/callous softener make a huge difference compared to stuff people can buy retail, but even so, some retail products are almost as effective, but people usually don't bother spending 45min looking after their own feet in one go. The SpaManicure range has a citrusy smell, but not too overpowering, and they don't smell synthetic.
Last edited by melb on Tue Mar 14, 2006 5:58 pm, edited 1 time in total.

Masthera
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Post by Masthera » Tue Mar 14, 2006 5:08 pm

Thanks for all the good info melb.

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Post by bodyworker » Wed Mar 15, 2006 10:54 am

Yes, thank you for the great info. I'm really interested in the products you mentioned. I've been looking for something to use on the feet that will leave them with a cool feeling.
Blue skies,

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Post by melb » Wed Mar 15, 2006 4:19 pm

The Creative Marine Gel is http://www.creativenaildesign.com/prod_ ... inegel.asp

Their heel cream is great too - http://www.creativenaildesign.com/prod_ ... erheel.asp you can get it in a tiny 1/2oz jar as well as the 4oz size. I tend to just hand out the 1/2oz size to people with really bad heels (mainly pregnant clients I am see every week or so, so they get a few bonuses :) ), and people love it. You can retail the tiny size, but if you don't know how little you need, it looks like an expensive little jar. I have retailed the 4oz size once they've used up the small size and can't live without it :)

And for dry heels the http://www.creativenaildesign.com/prod_ ... callus.asp callus smoother is great, can be fully sanitised, but a very similar cheaper option is this one - http://www.diamondwayayurveda.com/item134002.ctlg They don't tear the skin, just file the rough bits off as a fine white powder.

Since I've gone onto the Ayurvedic stuff the kansa vataki bowl treatment is wonerful. http://www.diamondwayayurveda.com/item159226.ctlg The bowl is small, only about 3" across, the photo is deceptive. http://www.diamondwayayurveda.com/productCat39735.ctlg is a link to their video for the PediKarma treatment - it's lovely, very relaxing, and effective. If someone is fairly acidic (eats a lot of sugar) the bowl reacts and you get a dramatic black coating on the feet, it's a good way of showing people that something is a bit out of balance. It's a great vidoe, but you'd get a lot more from their training. Their Tibetan Anise Foot Lotion http://www.diamondwayayurveda.com/item134020.ctlg is cooling for the body as it draws heat out of the body, particularly when it is used with the meatl bowl. Doesn't feel like an arctic blast on the feet, but the eyes do feel better!

Have look at http://www.bodyworkonline.com/forum/vie ... php?t=2054 for an Arctic Blast for Tired Legs and Feet idea :)
The professional range has a few extra products for coping with hard skin etc. Not sure how flexible Creative are in supplying massage therapists in the US, in Australia, as an aromatherapist I can get stuff from some of the beauty suppliers.

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Post by bodyworker » Thu Mar 16, 2006 11:18 am

My massage and day spa has only been opened for five months. I have 3 treatment rooms and a large room with supplies to 2 nail techs. Right now it's only me and one other MT that's there every day. I have 2 other MT's on call when I need them and the 2 nail techs are also on call. I have not been busy enough on the nail side to have someone there all the time. I would love to find a nail tech to rent from me that has a current client base.
Anyway, I think I'll check into the different foot/hand treatments you;ve been talking about that perhaps me and the other MT could do or even let the nail tech person do it, who knows.
We do currently offer a spa foot treatment that is done by the MT on the massage table. It starts out with a hot towel around the feet, then we exfoliate followed by a warm rose mud then covered with plastic parafin feet bags then wrapped in warm towels again, followed by a foot massage.
I plan on checking more into the different products and/or treatments you have talked about.
Thanks!
Blue skies,

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